2024 Pakistani general election: Difference between revisions – Wikipedia – Inergency – Inergency

4
2024 Pakistani general election: Difference between revisions – Wikipedia – Inergency – Inergency


 

Line 106: Line 106:

===Assassination attempt on Imran Khan and his subsequent arrest===

===Assassination attempt on Imran Khan and his subsequent arrest===

{{Main|Attempted assassination of Imran Khan|2023 Zaman Park raid|Arrest of Imran Khan|May 9 riots}}

{{Main|Attempted assassination of Imran Khan|2023 Zaman Park raid|Arrest of Imran Khan|May 9 riots}}

Following its ouster from the government, PTI continued to enjoy mass popularity with its supporters taking to the streets across the country.<ref>{{Cite web |date=2022-04-11 |title=PTI supporters hold widescale rallies to protest against ‘foreign conspiracy’ |url= |access-date=2024-02-07 |website=Business Recorder |language=en |archive-date=8 February 2024 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref> In July 2022, during a [[July 2022 Punjab provincial by-election|provincial by-election in Punjab]], the party had a landslide victory after winning 15 of the 20 seats. During [[2022 Pakistani by-elections|October 2022 by-elections]] conducted for the National Assembly, the party won 7 out of 9 seats with Khan winning 6 of the 7 seats he was contesting for.<ref>{{Cite web |last=Desk |first=BR Web |date=2022-10-16 |title=Oct 16 by-polls: PTI wins majority of seats in all three provinces |url= |access-date=2024-02-07 |website=Business Recorder |language=en |archive-date=26 April 2023 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref> Later in the year, Khan himself led a well-attended [[2022 Azadi March II|march of protest]] throughout the populous province of Punjab, to force an early general election.<ref>{{Cite web |last=Ahmed |first=Imran |date=2022-11-03 |url= |title=Interpreting Imran Khan’s Long March: Economy, Establishment and the Politics of Neutrality in Pakistan |access-date=2024-02-07 |website=ISAS Singapore |archive-date=8 February 2024 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref> However on 3 November 2022, while he was leading the march through [[Wazirabad]], he was shot at and injured in an [[Attempted assassination of Imran Khan|attempted assassination]].<ref>{{Cite news |last=Baloch |first=Shah Meer |date=2022-11-03 |title=Imran Khan wounded in ‘assassination attempt’ in Pakistan |url= |access-date=2024-02-07 |work=The Guardian |language=en-GB |issn=0261-3077 |archive-date=10 October 2023 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref>

Following its ouster from the government, PTI continued to enjoy mass popularity with its supporters taking to the streets across the country.<ref>{{Cite web |date=2022-04-11 |title=PTI supporters hold widescale rallies to protest against ‘foreign conspiracy’ |url= |access-date=2024-02-07 |website=Business Recorder |language=en |archive-date=8 February 2024 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref> In July 2022, during a [[July 2022 Punjab provincial by-election|provincial by-election in Punjab]], the party had a landslide victory after winning 15 of the 20 seats. During [[2022 Pakistani by-elections|October 2022 by-elections]] conducted for the National Assembly, the party won 7 out of 9 seats with Khan winning 6 of the 7 seats he was contesting for.<ref>{{Cite web |date=2022-10-16 |title=Oct 16 by-polls: PTI wins majority of seats in all three provinces |url= |access-date=2024-02-07 |website=Business Recorder |language=en |archive-date=26 April 2023 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref> Later in the year, Khan himself led a well-attended [[2022 Azadi March II|march of protest]] throughout the populous province of Punjab, to force an early general election.<ref>{{Cite web |last=Ahmed |first=Imran |date=2022-11-03 |url= |title=Interpreting Imran Khan’s Long March: Economy, Establishment and the Politics of Neutrality in Pakistan |access-date=2024-02-07 |website=ISAS Singapore |archive-date=8 February 2024 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref> However on 3 November 2022, while he was leading the march through [[Wazirabad]], he was shot at and injured in an [[Attempted assassination of Imran Khan|attempted assassination]].<ref>{{Cite news |last=Baloch |first=Shah Meer |date=2022-11-03 |title=Imran Khan wounded in ‘assassination attempt’ in Pakistan |url= |access-date=2024-02-07 |work=The Guardian |language=en-GB |issn=0261-3077 |archive-date=10 October 2023 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref>

As Khan was recovering from the gunshot wounds to his leg, the government registered several cases against him and [[2023 Zaman Park raid|attempted to arrest]] him from his home in [[Zaman Park]] on two different occasions during March 2023. Each time the police were unable to arrest him as his supporters intervened.<ref>{{Cite magazine |date=2023-03-14 |title=Pakistan Delays Attempt to Arrest Imran Khan: Latest Updates |url= |access-date=2024-02-08 |magazine=TIME |language=en |archive-date=28 September 2023 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref> Then on 9 May 2023, he was violently [[Arrest of Imran Khan|arrested]] by [[Pakistan Rangers|paramilitary forces]] while marking his attendance at [[Islamabad High Court]] in a corruption case. The arrest came a day after the country’s army warned him for accusing a high-ranking member of the [[Inter-Services Intelligence|ISI]], Major General [[Faisal Naseer]], of being responsible for the assassination attempt in November 2022.<ref>{{Cite web |date=2023-05-08 |title=ISPR warns Imran against hurling allegations against officer |url= |access-date=2024-02-08 |website=The Express Tribune |language=en |archive-date=20 September 2023 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref> Nationwide violence followed, in what were termed as [[May 9 riots]], with some demonstrators targeting military installations.<ref>{{Cite news |last=Noack |first=Rick |date=2023-05-10 |title=Arrest of Imran Khan, Pakistan’s former prime minister, prompts violent clashes |url= |access-date=2024-02-08 |newspaper=Washington Post |language=en-US |issn=0190-8286 |archive-date=10 May 2023 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref> Following the events, a crackdown was initiated against the party by the country’s military establishment. PTI’s leaders, party workers, and supporters, as well as those perceived to be allied to the party’s cause within the media and legal fraternity, were targeted.<ref name=”auto”>{{Cite web |last=Irfan |first=Wara |date=2023-11-10 |title=Six months to May 9: How PTI went from heights of popularity to facing obscurity |url= |access-date=2024-02-08 |website=DAWN.COM |language=en |archive-date=7 February 2024 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref><ref>{{Cite news |title=Imran Khan loses his battle with Pakistan’s army |url= |access-date=2024-02-08 |newspaper=The Economist |issn=0013-0613 |archive-date=4 February 2024 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref> Trials of civilians within [[Military Courts (Pakistan)|military courts]] were also initiated.<ref>{{Cite news |date=2024-01-16 |title=Pakistan military trial of most of 103 May 9 suspects almost complete: Report |url= |access-date=2024-02-08 |work=The Economic Times |issn=0013-0389 |archive-date=10 February 2024 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref> Several core leaders of the party have been in hiding since, with several incarcerated or forced to abandon the party.<ref name=”auto”/> Subsequently, two pro-establishment splinter groups emerged from within PTI, [[Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf Parliamentarians| PTI Parliamentarians]] (PTI-P), led by [[Pervez Khattak]], and [[Istehkam-e-Pakistan Party]] (IPP), led by [[Jahangir Tareen]].<ref>{{Cite web |date=2023-07-17 |title=”PTI Parliamentarians”: Pervez Khattak officially launches new political party |url= |access-date=2024-02-08 |website=Business Recorder |language=en |archive-date=5 February 2024 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref><ref>{{Cite web |date=2023-06-09 |title=JKT launches IPP as PTI defectors find new boss |url= |access-date=2024-02-08 |website=The Nation |language=en-US |archive-date=26 October 2023 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref>

As Khan was recovering from the gunshot wounds to his leg, the government registered several cases against him and [[2023 Zaman Park raid|attempted to arrest]] him from his home in [[Zaman Park]] on two different occasions during March 2023. Each time the police were unable to arrest him as his supporters intervened.<ref>{{Cite magazine |date=2023-03-14 |title=Pakistan Delays Attempt to Arrest Imran Khan: Latest Updates |url= |access-date=2024-02-08 |magazine=TIME |language=en |archive-date=28 September 2023 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref> Then on 9 May 2023, he was violently [[Arrest of Imran Khan|arrested]] by [[Pakistan Rangers|paramilitary forces]] while marking his attendance at [[Islamabad High Court]] in a corruption case. The arrest came a day after the country’s army warned him for accusing a high-ranking member of the [[Inter-Services Intelligence|ISI]], Major General [[Faisal Naseer]], of being responsible for the assassination attempt in November 2022.<ref>{{Cite web |date=2023-05-08 |title=ISPR warns Imran against hurling allegations against officer |url= |access-date=2024-02-08 |website=The Express Tribune |language=en |archive-date=20 September 2023 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref> Nationwide violence followed, in what were termed as [[May 9 riots]], with some demonstrators targeting military installations.<ref>{{Cite news |last=Noack |first=Rick |date=2023-05-10 |title=Arrest of Imran Khan, Pakistan’s former prime minister, prompts violent clashes |url= |access-date=2024-02-08 |newspaper=Washington Post |language=en-US |issn=0190-8286 |archive-date=10 May 2023 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref> Following the events, a crackdown was initiated against the party by the country’s military establishment. PTI’s leaders, party workers, and supporters, as well as those perceived to be allied to the party’s cause within the media and legal fraternity, were targeted.<ref name=”auto”>{{Cite web |last=Irfan |first=Wara |date=2023-11-10 |title=Six months to May 9: How PTI went from heights of popularity to facing obscurity |url= |access-date=2024-02-08 |website=DAWN.COM |language=en |archive-date=7 February 2024 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref><ref>{{Cite news |title=Imran Khan loses his battle with Pakistan’s army |url= |access-date=2024-02-08 |newspaper=The Economist |issn=0013-0613 |archive-date=4 February 2024 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref> Trials of civilians within [[Military Courts (Pakistan)|military courts]] were also initiated.<ref>{{Cite news |date=2024-01-16 |title=Pakistan military trial of most of 103 May 9 suspects almost complete: Report |url= |access-date=2024-02-08 |work=The Economic Times |issn=0013-0389 |archive-date=10 February 2024 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref> Several core leaders of the party have been in hiding since, with several incarcerated or forced to abandon the party.<ref name=”auto”/> Subsequently, two pro-establishment splinter groups emerged from within PTI, [[Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf Parliamentarians| PTI Parliamentarians]] (PTI-P), led by [[Pervez Khattak]], and [[Istehkam-e-Pakistan Party]] (IPP), led by [[Jahangir Tareen]].<ref>{{Cite web |date=2023-07-17 |title=”PTI Parliamentarians”: Pervez Khattak officially launches new political party |url= |access-date=2024-02-08 |website=Business Recorder |language=en |archive-date=5 February 2024 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref><ref>{{Cite web |date=2023-06-09 |title=JKT launches IPP as PTI defectors find new boss |url= |access-date=2024-02-08 |website=The Nation |language=en-US |archive-date=26 October 2023 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref>

Line 314: Line 314:

|[[Regionalism (politics)|Regionalism]]

|[[Regionalism (politics)|Regionalism]]

[[Opposition (politics)|Opposition]] to [[Pakistan People’s Party|PPP]]<ref>{{Cite web |last=Newspaper |first=From the |date=2012-05-11 |title=Mumtaz Bhutto reinvents himself, acts to strengthen anti-PPP front |url= |access-date=2024-02-10 |website=DAWN.COM |language=en |archive-date=12 October 2012 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref>

[[Opposition (politics)|Opposition]] to [[Pakistan People’s Party|PPP]]<ref>{{Cite web |date=2012-05-11 |title=Mumtaz Bhutto reinvents himself, acts to strengthen anti-PPP front |url= |access-date=2024-02-10 |website=DAWN.COM |language=en |archive-date=12 October 2012 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref>

|[[Pir of Pagaro VIII]]

|[[Pir of Pagaro VIII]]

|2.37%

|2.37%

Line 597: Line 597:

== Results ==

== Results ==

{{See also| List of members of the 16th National Assembly of Pakistan}}

{{See also| List of members of the 16th National Assembly of Pakistan}}

Unofficial early count data showed PTI-backed Independents leading in 148 constituencies, with PML-N leading in 43, and PPP leading in 47. Others led in 27 seats.<ref>{{Cite web |date=2024-02-09 |title=PTI’s independents surge |url= |access-date=2024-02-09 |website=The Express Tribune |language=en |archive-date=10 February 2024 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref><ref>{{Cite web |title=Pakistan election results show tight race with a long way to go |url= |access-date=2024-02-09 |website=Nikkei Asia |language=en-GB |archive-date=10 February 2024 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref> However, the Election Commission of Pakistan (ECP) issued a statement clarifying that media reports on election results sourced from the Commission sources were inaccurate, emphasizing that no official results had been released.<ref>{{cite web | url= | title=ECP instructs Provincial Election Commissioners, ROs to announce results within 30 minutes | date=9 February 2024 | access-date=9 February 2024 | archive-date=9 February 2024 | archive-url= | url-status=live }}</ref> PTI officials claimed that the official results were being tampered with, with cumulative polling stations’ results of their candidates not tallying with the provisional final counts being issued by result officers.<ref>{{Cite web |date=2024-02-09 |title=PTI-Backed Candidate Basharat Alleges Discrepancy Between Form 45 And Form 47 |url= |access-date=2024-02-09 |website=DAWN.COM |language=en |archive-date=10 February 2024 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref><ref>{{Cite news |date=2024-02-09 |title=Delays in Pakistan poll results, Imran Khan’s party alleges mass rigging |url= |access-date=2024-02-09 |work=The Economic Times |issn=0013-0389 |archive-date=10 February 2024 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref><ref>{{Cite web |title=Pakistan election results: Pakistan election count close amid rigging allegations |url= |access-date=2024-02-09 |website=BBC News |date=9 February 2024 |language=en-gb |archive-date=9 February 2024 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref><ref>{{Cite web |title=Pakistan polls: PTI alleges election tampering, claims votes ‘stolen |url= |access-date=2024-02-09 |website=The Times of India |language=en |archive-date=9 February 2024 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref> Several PTI-backed candidates from 3 of the 4 provinces, as well as the federal capital, challenged these allegedly doctored final counts in the courts.<ref>{{Cite web |date=2024-02-09 |title=LHC suspends RO’s Form-47 prepared in Raja’s absence |url= |access-date=2024-02-09 |website=The Express Tribune |language=en}}</ref><ref>{{Cite web |last=Desk |first=Web |date=2024-02-10 |title=Haleem Adil challenges results of NA-238 in SHC |url= |access-date=2024-02-10 |website=GNN – Pakistan’s Largest News Portal |language=en-US |archive-date=10 February 2024 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref><ref>{{Cite web |last=Shah |first=Rizwan |title=PTI-Backed Independent Candidates Challenge Election Results in LHC and IHC |url= |access-date=2024-02-10 |website=bnnbreaking.com |language=en |archive-date=10 February 2024 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref><ref>{{Cite web |title=Candidates move PHC against alleged rigging |url= |access-date=2024-02-10 |website=www.thenews.com.pk |language=en |archive-date=10 February 2024 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref> On 10 February, in an [[AI-generated speech|AI-generated]] victory speech from prison, [[Imran Khan]] claimed that based on completed forms provided by polling agents, his party had won a [[Supermajority|two-thirds majority]].<ref>{{Cite web |date=2024-02-09 |title=Imran declares election victory in AI-generated message |url= |access-date=2024-02-09 |website=The Express Tribune |language=en |archive-date=9 February 2024 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref><ref>{{Cite web |url= |title=Imran claims PTI-backed candidates have clinched two-third majority |access-date=9 February 2024 |archive-date=9 February 2024 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref> Nawaz Sharif, whose party won a plurality of seats in parliament, said that he might seek to build a governing coalition with the PPP.<ref>{{Cite web |date=2024-02-10 |title=PTI-linked independents take Pakistan election lead as counting nears end |url= |access-date=2024-02-10 |website=Al Jazeera |language=en |archive-date=10 February 2024 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref>

Unofficial early count data showed PTI-backed Independents leading in 148 constituencies, with PML-N leading in 43, and PPP leading in 47. Others led in 27 seats.<ref>{{Cite web |date=2024-02-09 |title=PTI’s independents surge |url= |access-date=2024-02-09 |website=The Express Tribune |language=en |archive-date=10 February 2024 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref><ref>{{Cite web |title=Pakistan election results show tight race with a long way to go |url= |access-date=2024-02-09 |website=Nikkei Asia |language=en-GB |archive-date=10 February 2024 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref> However, the Election Commission of Pakistan (ECP) issued a statement clarifying that media reports on election results sourced from the Commission sources were inaccurate, emphasizing that no official results had been released.<ref>{{cite web | url= | title=ECP instructs Provincial Election Commissioners, ROs to announce results within 30 minutes | date=9 February 2024 | access-date=9 February 2024 | archive-date=9 February 2024 | archive-url= | url-status=live }}</ref> PTI officials claimed that the official results were being tampered with, with cumulative polling stations’ results of their candidates not tallying with the provisional final counts being issued by result officers.<ref>{{Cite web |date=2024-02-09 |title=PTI-Backed Candidate Basharat Alleges Discrepancy Between Form 45 And Form 47 |url= |access-date=2024-02-09 |website=DAWN.COM |language=en |archive-date=10 February 2024 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref><ref>{{Cite news |date=2024-02-09 |title=Delays in Pakistan poll results, Imran Khan’s party alleges mass rigging |url= |access-date=2024-02-09 |work=The Economic Times |issn=0013-0389 |archive-date=10 February 2024 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref><ref>{{Cite web |title=Pakistan election results: Pakistan election count close amid rigging allegations |url= |access-date=2024-02-09 |website=BBC News |date=9 February 2024 |language=en-gb |archive-date=9 February 2024 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref><ref>{{Cite web |title=Pakistan polls: PTI alleges election tampering, claims votes ‘stolen |url= |access-date=2024-02-09 |website=The Times of India |language=en |archive-date=9 February 2024 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref> Several PTI-backed candidates from 3 of the 4 provinces, as well as the federal capital, challenged these allegedly doctored final counts in the courts.<ref>{{Cite web |date=2024-02-09 |title=LHC suspends RO’s Form-47 prepared in Raja’s absence |url= |access-date=2024-02-09 |website=The Express Tribune |language=en}}</ref><ref>{{Cite web |date=2024-02-10 |title=Haleem Adil challenges results of NA-238 in SHC |url= |access-date=2024-02-10 |website=GNN |language=en-US |archive-date=10 February 2024 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref><ref>{{Cite web |last=Shah |first=Rizwan |title=PTI-Backed Independent Candidates Challenge Election Results in LHC and IHC |url= |access-date=2024-02-10 |website=bnnbreaking.com |language=en |archive-date=10 February 2024 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref><ref>{{Cite web |title=Candidates move PHC against alleged rigging |url= |access-date=2024-02-10 |website=www.thenews.com.pk |language=en |archive-date=10 February 2024 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref> On 10 February, in an [[AI-generated speech|AI-generated]] victory speech from prison, [[Imran Khan]] claimed that based on completed forms provided by polling agents, his party had won a [[Supermajority|two-thirds majority]].<ref>{{Cite web |date=2024-02-09 |title=Imran declares election victory in AI-generated message |url= |access-date=2024-02-09 |website=The Express Tribune |language=en |archive-date=9 February 2024 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref><ref>{{Cite web |url= |title=Imran claims PTI-backed candidates have clinched two-third majority |access-date=9 February 2024 |archive-date=9 February 2024 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref> Nawaz Sharif, whose party won a plurality of seats in parliament, said that he might seek to build a governing coalition with the PPP.<ref>{{Cite web |date=2024-02-10 |title=PTI-linked independents take Pakistan election lead as counting nears end |url= |access-date=2024-02-10 |website=Al Jazeera |language=en |archive-date=10 February 2024 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref>

Despite assurances that official results might be released early on 9 February, the ECP only started releasing results more than 15 hours after polls closed, at noon on that day, citing complications brought about by the internet outage on election day.<ref>{{Cite web |title=Independent candidates backed by ex-PM Khan’s party lead as Pakistan announces election results |url= |access-date=2024-02-09 |website=Associated Press |date=9 February 2024 |language=en |archive-date=9 February 2024 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref> The electoral body had earlier assured that their system will not be affected by any kind of internet outage, and can work offline.<ref>{{Cite web |date=2024-02-08 |title=Election Commission Of Pakistan System Is Not Dependent On Internet: CEC |url= |access-date=2024-02-09 |website=DAWN.COM |language=en |archive-date=10 February 2024 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref> The [[Ministry of Interior (Pakistan)|Ministry of Interior]] cited communication challenges for the delay in election result compilation, attributing it to security precautions. These measures, aimed at ensuring the safety of personnel and ballots, led to the extended processing time. However, the Ministry assured that the situation was now under control and expected the results to follow suit.<ref>{{cite web | url= | title=Communication problems cause results to delay: Interior Ministry | date=9 February 2024 | access-date=10 February 2024 | archive-date=10 February 2024 | archive-url= | url-status=live }}</ref>

Despite assurances that official results might be released early on 9 February, the ECP only started releasing results more than 15 hours after polls closed, at noon on that day, citing complications brought about by the internet outage on election day.<ref>{{Cite web |title=Independent candidates backed by ex-PM Khan’s party lead as Pakistan announces election results |url= |access-date=2024-02-09 |website=Associated Press |date=9 February 2024 |language=en |archive-date=9 February 2024 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref> The electoral body had earlier assured that their system will not be affected by any kind of internet outage, and can work offline.<ref>{{Cite web |date=2024-02-08 |title=Election Commission Of Pakistan System Is Not Dependent On Internet: CEC |url= |access-date=2024-02-09 |website=DAWN.COM |language=en |archive-date=10 February 2024 |archive-url= |url-status=live }}</ref> The [[Ministry of Interior (Pakistan)|Ministry of Interior]] cited communication challenges for the delay in election result compilation, attributing it to security precautions. These measures, aimed at ensuring the safety of personnel and ballots, led to the extended processing time. However, the Ministry assured that the situation was now under control and expected the results to follow suit.<ref>{{cite web | url= | title=Communication problems cause results to delay: Interior Ministry | date=9 February 2024 | access-date=10 February 2024 | archive-date=10 February 2024 | archive-url= | url-status=live }}</ref>

Line 882: Line 882:

==International Observers Coverage==

==International Observers Coverage==

In October 2023, the Election Commission of Pakistan (ECP) issued invitations to foreign election observers, emphasizing transparency in the election process.<ref>{{Cite web|url= issues invitation for foreign election observers|date=25 October 2023|website=The Nation}}</ref> Before the elections, Pakistan received visa applications from 81 foreign journalists and 38 international observers. Visa applications were processed, and accreditation was made mandatory for foreign observers upon arrival in Pakistan.<ref>{{Cite web|url= foreign journalists, 38 observers seeking visas for Pakistan elections — minister|website=Arab News}}</ref> Eligible applicants were in the process of being approved with visas.<ref>{{Cite web|url= elections: 49 foreign journalists issued visas so far: govt|first=Recorder|last=Report|date=24 January 2024|website=Brecorder}}</ref><ref>{{Cite web|url= foreign journalists issued visas for coverage of elections: Solangi|date=24 January 2024|website=The News International}}</ref> The Pakistan High Commission in London issued visas to 37 British journalists, including prominent figures such as [[Christina Lamb]] of ”[[The Times]]”. These journalists, along with teams from other major international media organizations, are set to cover the election proceedings in Pakistan.<ref>{{Cite web|url= British journalists issued visas to cover Pakistan elections | Pakistan Recently}}</ref>

In October 2023, the Election Commission of Pakistan (ECP) issued invitations to foreign election observers, emphasizing transparency in the election process.<ref>{{Cite web|url= issues invitation for foreign election observers|date=25 October 2023|website=The Nation}}</ref> Before the elections, Pakistan received visa applications from 81 foreign journalists and 38 international observers. Visa applications were processed, and accreditation was made mandatory for foreign observers upon arrival in Pakistan.<ref>{{Cite web|url= foreign journalists, 38 observers seeking visas for Pakistan elections — minister|website=Arab News}}</ref> Eligible applicants were in the process of being approved with visas.<ref>{{Cite web|url= elections: 49 foreign journalists issued visas so far: govt|date=24 January 2024|website=Brecorder}}</ref><ref>{{Cite web|url= foreign journalists issued visas for coverage of elections: Solangi|date=24 January 2024|website=The News International}}</ref> The Pakistan High Commission in London issued visas to 37 British journalists, including prominent figures such as [[Christina Lamb]] of ”[[The Times]]”. These journalists, along with teams from other major international media organizations, are set to cover the election proceedings in Pakistan.<ref>{{Cite web|url= British journalists issued visas to cover Pakistan elections | Pakistan Recently}}</ref>

==Aftermath==

==Aftermath==

Elections for the 16th National Assembly of Pakistan

2024 Pakistani general election
Opinion polls
Registered 128,585,760

Map of Pakistan with National Assembly constituencies


General elections were held in Pakistan on 8 February 2024 to elect the members of the 16th National Assembly. The detailed schedule was announced by the Election Commission of Pakistan on 15 December 2023.

In the previous elections, the two major parties were the Pakistan Muslim League (N) (PML-N), led by former Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif and the Pakistan Peoples Party (PPP), led by former Foreign Minister Bilawal Bhutto Zardari. The Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf (PTI), founded by Imran Khan, being the largest party. However, it was forced to field its candidates as Independents after a controversial Supreme Court ruling stripped them of their electoral symbol in the run-up to the elections; Khan was also barred from politics for five years following convictions.[1][2]

PTI claimed widespread military interference in the election.[3][4] Multiple foreign media outlets accused the military of rigging the elections in favor of PML-N. Many international observers, including United States, European Union and the United Kingdom have voiced their concerns about the fairness of the elections.

Background

2018 elections

General elections were held in Pakistan on 25 July 2018 after the completion of a five-year term by the outgoing government. At the national level, elections were held in 272 constituencies, each electing one member to the National Assembly. At the provincial level, elections were held in each of the four provinces to elect Members of the Provincial Assemblies (MPA).

As a result of the elections, the Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf (PTI) became the single largest party at the national level in terms of both popular vote and seats. At the provincial level, the PTI remained the largest party in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KP); the Pakistan Peoples Party (PPP) remained the largest party in Sindh and the newly-formed Balochistan Awami Party (BAP) became the largest party in Balochistan. In Punjab, a hung parliament prevailed with Pakistan Muslim League (N) (PML-N) emerging as the largest party in terms of directly elected seats by a narrow margin. However, following the support of Pakistan Muslim League (Q) and the joining of independent MPAs into the PTI, the latter became the largest party and was able to form the government.

2022 constitutional crisis

On 8 March 2022, the opposition parties, under the banner of Pakistan Democratic Movement (PDM), submitted a motion of no confidence against Prime Minister Imran Khan to the National Assembly’s secretariat.[5][6] On 27 March 2022, Khan waved a diplomatic cypher from US in the public,[7] claiming that it demanded the removal of Khan’s government in a coup.[8] Later he changed his stance about the US conspiracy against his government, in an effort to mend ties with the country.[9][10] However, in August 2023, The Intercept claimed to have published the contents of the diplomatic cable which had American diplomat Donald Lu on record as stating that “all will be forgiven” concerning the country’s neutrality in the Ukraine conflict, if the no-confidence motion against Khan were to succeed.[11]

On 1 April 2022, Prime Minister Khan announced that in the context of the no-confidence motion against him in the National Assembly, the three options were discussed with “establishment” to choose from viz: “resignation, no-confidence [vote] or elections”.[12] On 3 April 2022, President Arif Alvi dissolved the National Assembly of Pakistan on Khan’s advice after the Deputy Speaker of the National Assembly rejected and set-aside the motion of no confidence; this move might have required elections to the National Assembly to be held within 90 days.[13][14] On 10 April, after a Supreme Court ruling that the no-confidence motion was illegally rejected, a no-confidence vote was conducted and he was ousted from office,[15][16] becoming the first prime minister in Pakistan to be removed from office by a vote of no confidence.[17][18][19] Khan claimed the US was behind his removal because he conducted an independent foreign policy and had friendly relations with China and Russia. His removal led to protests from his supporters across Pakistan.[20][21][22]

PDM government

After the success of the no-confidence motion, on 11 April 2022, Shehbaz Sharif became the Prime Minister after receiving 174 votes out of a total of 342, two more than the required majority with the support of Pakistan People’s Party, Jamiat Ulema-e-Islam and various smaller parties under the coalition of Pakistan Democratic Movement (PDM). Dissident members of PTI also supported his candidature. Meanwhile, the remaining PTI members, who were now in the opposition, boycotted the session terming it a continuation of a “foreign conspiracy”.[23] A day later, over 100 PTI members tendered resignations from their National Assembly seats.[24]

The PDM government remained in power until 10 August 2023. Sharif’s tenure was marked by historically high inflation, contraction of the national economy, and a record devaluation of the Pakistani rupee.[25][26][27]

Assassination attempt on Imran Khan and his subsequent arrest

Following its ouster from the government, PTI continued to enjoy mass popularity with its supporters taking to the streets across the country.[28] In July 2022, during a provincial by-election in Punjab, the party had a landslide victory after winning 15 of the 20 seats. During October 2022 by-elections conducted for the National Assembly, the party won 7 out of 9 seats with Khan winning 6 of the 7 seats he was contesting for.[29] Later in the year, Khan himself led a well-attended march of protest throughout the populous province of Punjab, to force an early general election.[30] However on 3 November 2022, while he was leading the march through Wazirabad, he was shot at and injured in an attempted assassination.[31]

As Khan was recovering from the gunshot wounds to his leg, the government registered several cases against him and attempted to arrest him from his home in Zaman Park on two different occasions during March 2023. Each time the police were unable to arrest him as his supporters intervened.[32] Then on 9 May 2023, he was violently arrested by paramilitary forces while marking his attendance at Islamabad High Court in a corruption case. The arrest came a day after the country’s army warned him for accusing a high-ranking member of the ISI, Major General Faisal Naseer, of being responsible for the assassination attempt in November 2022.[33] Nationwide violence followed, in what were termed as May 9 riots, with some demonstrators targeting military installations.[34] Following the events, a crackdown was initiated against the party by the country’s military establishment. PTI’s leaders, party workers, and supporters, as well as those perceived to be allied to the party’s cause within the media and legal fraternity, were targeted.[35][36] Trials of civilians within military courts were also initiated.[37] Several core leaders of the party have been in hiding since, with several incarcerated or forced to abandon the party.[35] Subsequently, two pro-establishment splinter groups emerged from within PTI, PTI Parliamentarians (PTI-P), led by Pervez Khattak, and Istehkam-e-Pakistan Party (IPP), led by Jahangir Tareen.[38][39]

Schedule controversies

In January 2023, in a bid to force early general elections, PTI prematurely dissolved the provincial assemblies it was in power in – namely Punjab and Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa. According to the constitution of Pakistan, after the dissolution of an assembly, elections are supposed to be held there within 90 days, thus, constitutionally limiting the date for the two provincial elections to be no later than April 2023.[40][41] However, the Election Commission of Pakistan (ECP) delayed the elections to October 2023, citing lack of funds provided by the PDM government and the unavailability of the required security personnel.[42][43] PTI approached the Supreme Court of Pakistan against the electoral body’s decision, terming it a violation of the constitution, and with a majority verdict the court declared the ECP’s earlier ruling as unconstitutional and ordered it to hold elections by 14 May 2023.[44] After the nationwide May 9 riots that broke out following Imran Khan’s arrest – the election date passed without the Supreme Court order being enforced. On 30 May, after the passage of a new law, the PDM government filed a review petition against the court’s earlier ruling.[45]

On 10 August 2023, the National Assembly was prematurely dissolved by the President Arif Alvi on the advice of Prime Minister Shehbaz Sharif. This meant that the election must be held no later than 8 November 2023.[46][47] However, on 5 August 2023, the results of the 2023 digital census were approved by the Council of Common Interests headed by Shehbaz Sharif.[48] Therefore, elections were to be delayed to February 2024 at the latest, as announced by the Election Commission of Pakistan in order to carry out fresh electoral delimitations in light of the approved census results.[49][50] Despite that, on 13 September 2023, President Alvi proposed 6 November 2023 as a date to the ECP and advised it to seek guidance from the Supreme Court for the announcement of the election date.[51] On 2 November 2023, the ECP and the President agreed on 8 February 2024 as the date for the general election.[52][53]

Return of Nawaz Sharif to electoral politics

At the start of May 2023, the PDM government adopted a law that allows for the filing of review petitions against prior Supreme Court verdicts.[54] At the end of June, another law, limiting disqualification to five years, was adopted. It also allows the electoral commission to announce the date of an election without consulting the President of the country.[55]

After serving 12 months of his 7-year sentence on corruption charges, former prime minister Nawaz Sharif left the country on 19 November 2019 to receive medical treatment in London, promising to return in 4 weeks.[56] He was declared a fugitive in 2021 after failing to appear before courts despite summons.[57] Sharif obtained protective bail on 19 October 2023, which allowed him to return from 4 years of self-imposed exile without being arrested.[58] On October 21, he returned to the country where he was welcomed in Lahore by a gathering of tens of thousands of his supporters.[59]

On 9 January 2024, a 7-member Supreme Court bench under Chief Justice Qazi Faez Isa, hearing a review petition against lifetime disqualification, announced a 6-1 majority verdict with Justice Yahya Afridi dissenting. The verdict set aside the earlier Supreme Court interpretation of lifetime disqualification for article 62(1)(f) of the constitution, stating that it violated fundamental rights, and instead set a 5-year disqualification following the newly passed laws for lawmakers who fail the moral standard of “sadiq and ameen” (honest and righteous).[60] The timing of the verdict ensured that Sharif, who was disqualified for life in the Panama Papers case in 2017, is eligible to contest these elections with a possible fourth term as prime minister.[61]

PTI de facto ban through intra-party election verdict

On 22 December 2023, the Election Commission of Pakistan (ECP) decided against allowing the PTI to keep its electoral symbol, asserting that the party had failed to conduct intra-party elections to the Commission’s satisfaction. Subsequently, on the same day, the PTI appealed to the Peshawar High Court (PHC) challenging the ECP’s decision. Consequently, a single-member bench suspended the ECP’s order until 9 January 2024. On 30 December 2023, the ECP submitted a review application to the PHC. In the following days, a two-member bench lifted the suspension order while hearing the case. However, on 10 January 2024, the two-member bench deemed the ECP’s order “illegal, without any lawful authority, and of no legal effect.” Responding to this, on 11 January, the ECP contested the ruling in the Supreme Court.[62]

On 13 January, a three-member bench, headed by Chief Justice Faez Isa, sided with the ECP, reinstating their initial decision to deny the PTI its election symbol, the cricket bat, due to the party’s failure to conduct intra-party elections by its constitution. Consequently, the PTI was unable to allocate party tickets to any of its candidates, resulting in all party candidates being listed as independent candidates with individual electoral symbols.[63] The party also lost the right to nominate candidates for 226 reserved seats across the central and provincial legislatures.[64]

The SCP’s decision led some legal experts to describe the ruling as a “huge blow to fundamental rights” and “a defeat for democratic norms.”[65]

Imran Khan’s convictions

In the week before the elections, Imran Khan was sentenced to jail terms in three separate cases. On 30 January 2024, with the government seeking a death penalty, he was sentenced to 10 years in a case dealing with the handling of state secrets by Judge Abul Hasnat Zulqarnain.[66] A day later, Judge Muhammad Bashir, sentenced him and his wife, Bushra Bibi, to a jail term of 14 years, along with a fine of Rs. 787 million (US$2.7 million) each for retaining a jewellery set that was a state gift from Saudi Arabia against an undervalued assessment from the country’s Toshakhana. The ruling also barred Khan from holding public office for 10 years.[67] Two days later, Judge Qudratullah declared the marriage of Khan and his wife against Islamic law and sentenced both to prison for a term of seven years for allegedly solemnizing their marriage during Bushra’s Iddah period. The case was lodged on the complaint of Khawar Maneka, Bushra’s former husband, five years after her marriage to Khan.[68]

All three trials were held behind closed doors in Adiala Jail, where Khan has been incarcerated since August 2023 on corruption charges, and were marked with rushed proceedings, sudden replacement of defendant’s lawyers with state consuls, and other procedural irregularities that led his party to term the decisions to be coming from “kangaroo courts”.[69][70][71] Khan’s sentencing in the marriage case was decried by lawyers and members of the civil society as an overreach and a blow to women’s rights.[72][73][74] Meanwhile, some observers termed the sentencings as a continuation of the Pakistani military’s engineering to keep Khan out of power in the upcoming elections.[75][76][77] On election day, a PTI official said Khan had been allowed to vote in prison using a postal ballot.[78]

Allegations of pre-poll rigging

Some observers, including the United Nations and Human Rights Watch, have pointed to what appears to be pre-poll rigging in the run-up to the upcoming elections. There have been notable actions against the Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf (PTI) party and its leaders, including snatching of nomination papers, arbitrary arrests of candidates and their supporters, systematic rejection of nomination papers, and disruption of campaign events. This situation has led to widespread allegations of ‘election engineering’ and manipulative practices that can potentially favour certain political groups, casting doubts over the fairness of the electoral process.[79][76][80][81] Pakistan’s electoral commission was also accused of gerrymandering in favour of PML-N during the redrawing of voter maps before the elections, with a record 1,300 complaints made.[82]

Many candidates affiliated with the PTI complained that following the ban on the usage of the cricket bat as the party’s logo for the ballots, the electoral commission provided them with symbols carrying obscure meanings and sometimes awkward connotations such as a calculator, an electric heater, a dice, a bed, an eggplant, which is deemed anatomically suggestive, and a bottle, which carries suggestions of alcohol consumption in the majority-Muslim country.[83][84]

Censorship

On 26 January 2024, PTI’s official website, insaf.pk, and a separate website made for disseminating information regarding the individual electoral symbols of the party’s candidates were blocked in Pakistan.[85] A voter helpline created by the party was also blocked.[86] Previously, social media was blocked in the country during the party’s virtual electoral events on at least three separate occasions as per internet watchdog, NetBlocks.[87][88]

Journalists covering the elections reported a ‘near-blanket ban’ on their ability to cover PTI candidates fairly. News channels allegedly received messages from individuals belonging to Pakistan’s military establishment instructing them to remove all references to PTI in their visuals, graphics, and talking points.[89]

Election day violence and disruptions

Widespread internet disruption, with complete closure of mobile phone networks, was observed and condemned by Amnesty International as a blunt attack on the rights to freedom of expression and peaceful assembly.[90] Several polling stations faced instances of violence, ballot box snatching, vandalism and gunfire. [91][92][93]

Electoral system

The 336 members of the National Assembly consist of 266 general seats elected by first-past-the-post voting in single-member constituencies,[94] 60 seats reserved for women elected by proportional representation based on the number of general seats won by each party in each province, and ten seats reserved for non-Muslims elected through proportional representation based on the number of overall general seats won by each party.

The government had passed a bill that required the next general elections to be held using EVMs (electronic voting machines). This was aimed at ending the allegations of rigging that have plagued previous elections in Pakistan. Still, the opposition’s opinion was that it might make it extremely easy for PTI to rig the elections in their favour through security loopholes.[95]
In 2022 when the PTI-led government was ousted through a successful vote of no-confidence in the National Assembly, the 11 opposition parties, some of them being long-time rivals, formed a new government and passed the Elections Amendment Bill, which nullified the use of EVMs in the next general elections. Hence, EVMs were not used in the current general elections. Instead paper ballots were once again employed during the elections.

Voting and transmission of results

Registered voters in each polling station of an electoral district get two paper ballots to put a stamp on their preferred candidate for the national and provincial assembly respectively. These ballots are then counted by a presiding officer who then transmits the results for their polling station to the returning officer (RO) in Form 45. Copies of Form 45 are also given to the observing polling agents of the contesting candidates. The RO then consolidates these Form 45s, in front of the contesting candidates of the constituency they are overseeing, to give a provisional result in Form 47. The ECP then uses the data from Form 47 to officially notify elected members for each constituency using Form 49, provided that no candidate contested the unofficial counts given in Form 47.[96]

Timeline

In July 2023 the ECP invited political parties to submit applications for the allocation of electoral symbols,[97] given that about 40% of the Pakistani population is illiterate.[98]

As of 25 July 2023, the total number of registered voters in Pakistan stood around 127 million as compared to 106 million (including 59.22 million men and 46.73 million women voters) in 2018, according to the data released by the ECP.[99] According to the figures, the number of eligible female voters stood at 58.5 million (around 46 per cent of the total registered voters) while the number of eligible male voters was 68.5 million (about 54 per cent of the total voters).[100]

In late September the ECP announced that citizens over 18 can update their voter details until 25 October 2023. The ECP decided to “unfreeze” the electoral rolls to allow registered voters to rectify or update their details.[101]

On 2 November 2023, President Arif Alvi and the ECP agreed on holding general elections on 8 February, after a meeting was held in Aiwan-i-Sadr on the orders of the Supreme Court of Pakistan (SCP). The SCP had instructed the ECP to consult with the President on the poll date.[102]

On 15 December 2023, the ECP issued the election schedule. It set 22 December as the last date for filing nomination papers.[103] On that day however, the ECP extended the deadline for the submission of nomination papers to 24 December.[104] More than 5,000 people were officially recognized as candidates for the 266 directly-elected seats in the National Assembly, with only 313 of them being women.[98]

Parties

The table below lists each party that either received a share of the vote higher than 0.5% in the 2018 Pakistan general election or had representation in the 15th National Assembly of Pakistan. Political parties are ordered by their vote share in the 2018 elections. Independent Candidates bagged 11.46% of the vote and 13 national assembly seats (both general seats and total seats in the 15th National Assembly, as reserved seats for women and minorities, are given to political parties) in 2018.

Opinion polls

In August 2023, the ECP imposed a total ban on entrance and exit polls including those on official digital media accounts of electronic and print media outlets.[106]

Last date
of polling
Polling firm Link PTI PML(N) PPP MMA[c] TLP Other Ind. Lead Margin
of error
Sample
size
Undecideds &
Non-voters[d]
30 June 2023 Gallup Pakistan PDF 42% 20% 12% 4% 4% 5% 22% ±2.5% 3,500 13%
3 June 2022 IPOR (IRI) PDF 39% 33% 12% 7% 4% 5% 6% ±2 – 3% 2,003 25%
21 March 2022 IPOR (IRI) PDF 35% 33% 19% 6% 4% 3% 2% ±2 – 3% 3,509 16%
31 January 2022 Gallup Pakistan PDF 34% 33% 15% 6% 3% 9% 1% ±3 – 5% 5,688 33%
9 January 2022 IPOR (IRI) PDF 31% 33% 17% 3% 3% 11% 1% 2% ±2 – 3% 3,769 11%
11 November 2020 IPOR (IRI) PDF 36% 38% 13% 4% 3% 6% 2% ±3.22% 2,003 32%
13 August 2020 IPOR (IRI) PDF 33% 38% 15% 3% 3% 8% 5% ±2.95% 2,024 26%
30 June 2020 IPOR (IRI) PDF 24% 27% 11% 3% 2% 33% 3% ±2.38% 1,702 N/A[e]
24 June 2019 Gallup Pakistan PDF 31% 28% 15% 5% 21% 3% ±3 – 5% ~1,400 N/A
22 November 2018 IPOR (IRI) PDF 43% 27% 15% 1% 1% 11% 1% 16% ±2.05% 3,991 22%
25 July 2018 2018 Elections ECP 31.8% 24.3% 13.0% 4.8% 4.2% 10.3% 11.5% 7.5% N/A 53,123,733 N/A

Security concerns and violence

The Election Commission of Pakistan categorised half the country’s 90,675 polling stations as either “sensitive”, meaning there is a risk of violence, or “most sensitive”, indicating a higher risk. The classifications were based on the area’s security situation and history of electoral violence.[107] In Balochistan Province alone, caretaker provincial home minister Muhammad Zubair Jamali said that almost 80% of its 5,028 polling stations had been declared “sensitive”.[108]

Pre-poll violence

On 25 January 2024, the Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan pledged not to stage attacks on election rallies and might limit itself to attacking military and police targets during the election period. This followed the government’s decision to deploy troops in sensitive constituencies after intelligence agencies warned that militants can target rallies.[109]

Two candidates were killed during the election campaign. On 10 January, Malik Kaleem Ullah, an independent candidate for the Provincial Assembly of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, was shot dead while on a door-to-door sortie, while on 31 January, Rehan Zaib Khan, an independent candidate affiliated with the PTI, was killed after gunmen opened fire on his car in a market in Bajaur, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, in an attack that also injured three people and was claimed by the Islamic State – Khorasan Province (ISIS-K). On 30 January, four people were killed and five others injured in an explosion during a PTI rally in Sibi, Balochistan Province, while on 31 January, 15 people were injured in attacks on residences and offices of PPP candidates and the election office of the PML-N in Balochistan, which was partially claimed by the Baloch Liberation Army.[110] On 7 February, 29 people were killed in explosions outside an independent candidate’s office and an office of the JUI-F in Balochistan.[111] Both attacks were claimed by ISIS-K.[112]

Incidents on election day

The Pakistan Ministry of Foreign Affairs announced the closure of its borders with Iran and Afghanistan on the eve of the general elections on 8 February, as a measure to enhance security.[113][114]

Ten minutes before polling stations opened, the interior ministry announced the suspension of mobile internet services across the country, citing recent terrorist incidents.[98] NetBlocks director Alp Toker called the outage “amongst the largest” that they had observed. The PPP’s Bilawal Bhutto Zardari demanded that the government restore services and said its lawyers might challenge the decision in court.[115] The PTI called the outage a “cowardly act”.[84]

In Balochistan, grenades were thrown at two polling stations by unidentified individuals. At the same time, a soldier was killed in an attack by gunmen in Kot Azam, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa.[116] Five security personnel were killed in an attack in Kulachi, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, while a polling station in the same province was shelled by mortars. Two security officers were killed and nine wounded by an explosion near a polling station in Lajja, Balochistan, while two people were injured following 14 “minor blasts” in Gwadar.[78]

Post-election violence

On 9 February, two PTI workers were killed and 24 others were injured after clashes broke out between police and PTI supporters demonstrating against alleged electoral fraud in Shangla District, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa.[117][118] On 10 February, Mohsin Dawar, the leader of the National Democratic Movement who was running for a national assembly seat in North Waziristan, was seriously injured in a gun attack in Miranshah.[119] On 11 February, six people, including a police officer, were killed and five others were injured in election-related clashes in Larkana, Sindh.[120]

Results

Unofficial early count data showed PTI-backed Independents leading in 148 constituencies, with PML-N leading in 43, and PPP leading in 47. Others led in 27 seats.[121][122] However, the Election Commission of Pakistan (ECP) issued a statement clarifying that media reports on election results sourced from the Commission sources were inaccurate, emphasizing that no official results had been released.[123] PTI officials claimed that the official results were being tampered with, with cumulative polling stations’ results of their candidates not tallying with the provisional final counts being issued by result officers.[124][125][126][127] Several PTI-backed candidates from 3 of the 4 provinces, as well as the federal capital, challenged these allegedly doctored final counts in the courts.[128][129][130][131] On 10 February, in an AI-generated victory speech from prison, Imran Khan claimed that based on completed forms provided by polling agents, his party had won a two-thirds majority.[132][133] Nawaz Sharif, whose party won a plurality of seats in parliament, said that he might seek to build a governing coalition with the PPP.[134]

Despite assurances that official results might be released early on 9 February, the ECP only started releasing results more than 15 hours after polls closed, at noon on that day, citing complications brought about by the internet outage on election day.[135] The electoral body had earlier assured that their system will not be affected by any kind of internet outage, and can work offline.[136] The Ministry of Interior cited communication challenges for the delay in election result compilation, attributing it to security precautions. These measures, aimed at ensuring the safety of personnel and ballots, led to the extended processing time. However, the Ministry assured that the situation was now under control and expected the results to follow suit.[137]

However, despite the restoration of mobile signals in the early hours of 9 February, the results still faced delays.[138] The declaration of provisional results was not done until the late hours of 10 February, more than two days after the vote count had started.[139]

Allegations of rigging

Salman Akram Raja, a PTI leader and candidate was quoted in The Guardian saying that he has pursued legal action, referring to the military’s involvement by stating, “They decided to rewrite the results.”[4] The PTI claimed that the results of at least 18 National Assembly seats were “falsely changed” by election officers, while at least six of its losing affiliated candidates launched legal appeals questioning the results, including Yasmin Rashid, who lost to Nawaz Sharif in a Lahore constituency.[140]

Jan Muhammad Buledi, a former spokesperson of the Balochistan provincial government and secretary general of the National Party was quoted in The Guardian as saying that he received a direct death threat from an army colonel after he publicly accused the military of stuffing the ballot boxes with fake votes in the constituency where he was a candidate.[4]

Analysis

The New York Times wrote the election results had caught several off guard, as the PML-N was widely anticipated to secure a landslide victory with the backing of the military. The report noted that voters expressed frustration with the military’s interference in politics and opted to vote for PTI candidates in defiance of the military generals.[141] It went on to say the election results had humiliated the military establishment and started a new political crisis in the country.[142] The Washington Post wrote that the election results were a humiliation for Nawaz Sharif, despite being seen as the favored candidate of the Pakistani military, which had held significant influence in determining the prime minister.[143]

France 24 called the election “The ‘generals’ elections’ which turned against the military”. It also dubbed the election as the “most rigged” in the country’s history saying the military was seen as backing Nawaz Sharif.[144] According to TIME, the Pakistani military did everything to “sideline Imran Khan—and failed,” but said that the military was continuing to try and prevent the PTI from returning to power.[145]

Ryan Grim in an article published by The Intercept said that the historic turnout in Pakistan was swamping the military’s effort to rig the election and that the military has proved unable to suppress the populist movement interrogating its authority.[146] According to The Economist, reports suggest that the despite their efforts, the military leadership did not seem to have as much control as they believed to prevent Khan from winning.[147]

The Guardian noted that suspicions of military rigging arose during election day due to a nationwide mobile phone blackout and the slow counting of results, leading to concerns that the military was exerting influence to secure the PML-N’s success.[148] It added that the military’s attempts to influence the election appeared to have been thwarted, particularly due to the PTI’s effective utilization of social media, given the significant levels of illiteracy in the country.[149] In a separate article, The Guardian noted analysts’ views that the election results and potential weak coalition government align with the military’s interests, protecting their political and business agendas.[3]

Prominent Pakistani columnist Khurram Husain was quoted in the Financial Times as saying that Pakistan will experience not only the influence of the military but also a collaborative endeavor involving the judiciary and major political parties to thwart the PTI from assuming power.[150]

The New York Post, referencing the New York Times article, stated that this election marks the initial instance in Pakistan’s history where a party has achieved such success without the support of the military and this will spark a new political choas in the country.[151] According to Canadian Broadcasting Corporation the election results did not unfold as per the military’s expectations and had shaken the elite. Hasan Askari Rizvi was quoted as saying, “This is a negative vote for the policies that the military was pursuing.”.[152]

Sameer Arshad Khatlani in an opinion piece for the Dhaka Tribune wrote “Election results seem to be blowing up in the military establishment’s face which attempted to make Imran Khan irrelevant by jailing him, cracking down PTI”.[153] Lipika Pelham wrote for the BBC saying despite PTI-backed independents winning the majority of seats in parliament, they were unlikely to be permitted to form a government.[154]

During an interview with The Wire, Najam Sethi remarked that Imran Khan and the PTI had strongly resisted the influence of the military, which led to the latter resorting to last-minute rigging efforts.[155] Firstpost wrote that the Pakistani military had experienced a setback, at least temporarily, with public sentiment turning against it. It also noted that allegations of electoral fraud by the military put Western countries in a difficult position, given their historic support of the military to ensure the security of the country’s nuclear arsenal.[156] According to Firstpost, “General Asim Munir’s tenure may be remembered as one of the darkest for the army, with its reputation suffering greatly under his leadership.” It also raised concern over Pakistani army chief general Asim Munir’s post-election speech, describing it as uncommon.[157] The Times of India also described Munir as the primary loser of the election.[158] The Indian Express wrote that the unexpected success of the PTI forced the military to manipulate results to avoid an unfavorable outcome. Consequently, there were delays in announcing results, and internet and mobile services were suspended in numerous regions. Meanwhile, Pakistani social media platforms were flooded with videos depicting alleged rigging and manipulation.[159] The Deccan Herald wrote that although the election results represented a significant setback for the military, and might potentially undermine General Munir’s position, but it was unlikely that the military will relinquish its influential role in determining the next Prime Minister.[160]

Provisional results by party

The election was postponed in the NA-8 Bajaur constituency in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa due to the killing of candidate Rehan Zaib Khan. Provincial assembly elections were also postponed in the constituencies of PK-22 and PK-91 (both in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa) due to the deaths of candidates there.[161]

Reruns

The ECP ordered elections to be held again in the NA-88 Khushab-II constituency in Punjab after a mob destroyed election materials at the office of the returning officer. Elections were also ordered repeated in the provincial assembly constituencies in PS-18 Ghotki-I in Sindh and PK-90 Kohat-I in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa after election materials were either stolen or destroyed.[162]

International Observers Coverage

In October 2023, the Election Commission of Pakistan (ECP) issued invitations to foreign election observers, emphasizing transparency in the election process.[163] Before the elections, Pakistan received visa applications from 81 foreign journalists and 38 international observers. Visa applications were processed, and accreditation was made mandatory for foreign observers upon arrival in Pakistan.[164] Eligible applicants were in the process of being approved with visas.[165][166] The Pakistan High Commission in London issued visas to 37 British journalists, including prominent figures such as Christina Lamb of The Times. These journalists, along with teams from other major international media organizations, are set to cover the election proceedings in Pakistan.[167]

Aftermath

Reactions

Domestic

After polling closed, caretaker Prime Minister Anwaar ul Haq Kakar said that the elections were a “momentous occasion”. He praised the enthusiasm of the people of Pakistan and expressed appreciation for their participation in the polling process, adding that “the high voter turnout is a clear indication of public commitment to shaping the future of our country.”[168]

Chief Election Commissioner Sikandar Sultan Raja thanked the nation for the successful election and expressed gratitude to all stakeholders, including government bodies, security agencies, media, and voters. He urged returning officers to ensure timely results delivery.[169] The Pakistan Armed Forces, through its media wing ISPR, extended congratulations to the nation for the peaceful conduct of the general elections, emphasizing their role in advancing democracy and fulfilling the aspirations of the people.[170] Chief of the Army Staff Asim Munir urged citizens to move on from the politics of “anarchy and polarization”, adding that a stable hand was needed to unite “Pakistan’s diverse polity”, and to make “democracy functional and purposeful”.[171]

President Arif Alvi, stated that the use of electronic voting machines (EVMs) can have averted the uncertainty surrounding the election results and reminded of his efforts to introduce them in the country’s electoral process.[172]

In a message from jail, Imran Khan claimed that the PTI won 170 seats, achieving a two-thirds majority in the 2024 elections.[173] He emphasized the power of the electorate and called for the protection of their votes.[173]

The Pakistan Foreign Ministry in a statement expressed surprise at international criticism regarding the elections, citing the complexity of the electoral process and the strong participation of millions of voters.[174][175]

The day after the election, the Pakistan Stock Exchange shed 2,200 points on opening, or 3.6% of its value, as delayed results and prospects of a hung parliament loomed.[176]

Dawn in its editorial titled “Respect the mandate” stated it is becoming increasingly clear that there is widespread anger and resentment towards the military’s continuous involvement in civilian affairs, and urged the armed forces to abandon its grudge against the PTI. It added that “though the public’s decision was quite evident, some quarters still attempted to stamp their will over the election results.” It also noted that “the state must realise that, sometimes, a vote for the underdog is a vote against the establishment”.[177]

The Express Tribune in its editorial stated “the fact that the people of Pakistan have made a choice, and have voted for parliamentary democracy must come as a soothing consolation.”[178]

International

  •  Australia The Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade in a press statement expressed regret saying that “the Pakistani people were restricted in their choice, since not all political parties were allowed to contest these elections.”[179]
  •  European Union – High Representative for Foreign Affairs Josep Borrell called for upon the relevant authorities to “ensure a timely and full investigation of all reported election irregularities and to implement the recommendations of the upcoming EU Election Expert Mission report.”[180]
  •  United Kingdom – Foreign Secretary David Cameron in a statement noted “serious concerns raised about the fairness and lack of inclusivity of the elections” while also acknowledging “the restrictions imposed on internet access on polling day, significant delays to the reporting of results and claims of irregularities in the counting process”.[181]
  •  United States – State Department spokesman Matthew Miller called for a “full investigation into the claims of interference or fraud” during the elections while reiterating to work with whoever forms the next government.[182] Several US lawmakers expressed concerns over the conduct of polls, poll-related violence, and restrictions on freedom of speech.[183] Several lawmakers also called on the Biden administration to refrain from acknowledging the election results and the incoming government in Pakistan until purported irregularities are thoroughly investigated[184] including Congressman Ro Khanna who also alleged that the Pakistani military was backing Nawaz Sharif.[185]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b Contesting as independent candidates in all constituencies
  2. ^ Ran as Independent candidates under panel name “Wafa Parast Group”
  3. ^ Certain polls only include data for the JUI(F) instead of the MMA. In those cases, data for the JUI(F) is used because the JUI(F) is the largest constituent party of the MMA and makes up most of its base.
  4. ^ This is a column that lists the percentage of undecided voters and non-voters in certain polls that publish this data. As some polls do not publish any data on undecided voters and non-voters, the columns with survey participants who had a preference when polled are all that is needed to reach 100%. In surveys that do include data on non-voters and undecided voters, a scaling factor is applied to the margin of error and the rest of the data (for example, if the number of undecideds and non-voters equals 20%, each party might have their vote share scaled up by a factor of 100/80 (the formula is 100/(100-UndecidedPercentage)). This is done to keep consistency between the different polls and the types of data they provide.
  5. ^ This poll or crosstabulation did not include any data about undecided voters or non-voters and cut them out completely from the published results.

References

  1. ^ “Former Pakistan PM Imran Khan barred from politics for 5 years”. Al Jazeera. 8 August 2023. Archived from the original on 8 February 2024. Retrieved 10 February 2024.
  2. ^ “Pakistan’s Imran Khan still barred from vote after conviction appeal fails -lawyer”. Reuters. 21 December 2023. Retrieved 10 February 2024.
  3. ^ a b Ellis-Petersen, Hannah; Baloch, Shah Meer (10 February 2024). “Imran Khan claims victory in Pakistan poll but military might have final say”. The Observer. Retrieved 11 February 2024.
  4. ^ a b c Ellis-Petersen, Hannah; Baloch, Shah Meer (11 February 2024). “Protests take place across Pakistan amid election vote-rigging allegations”. The Guardian. Retrieved 11 February 2024.
  5. ^ “Opposition submits no-confidence motion against PM Imran Khan”. www.geo.tv. Archived from the original on 10 April 2022. Retrieved 9 March 2022.
  6. ^ Shahzad, Asif (8 March 2022). “Pakistani opposition moves no-confidence motion to seek PM Khan’s ouster”. Reuters. Archived from the original on 27 March 2022. Retrieved 4 April 2022.
  7. ^ Malik, Hasnaat (10 April 2022). “Imran Khan sends diplomatic cypher to CJP”. The Express Tribune. Archived from the original on 28 August 2022. Retrieved 22 December 2023.
  8. ^ “Copy of cipher ‘missing’ from PM House records, cabinet told”. Dawn. 30 September 2022. Archived from the original on 22 December 2023. Retrieved 22 December 2023.
  9. ^ Hussain, Abid (14 November 2022). “Imran Khan’s U-turn: No longer blaming US for his ouster as PM”. Al Jazeera. Archived from the original on 31 December 2023. Retrieved 22 December 2023.
  10. ^ “Imran Khan seeks to repair ties with US; says cipher conspiracy is over”. The News International. 13 November 2022. Archived from the original on 21 June 2023. Retrieved 22 December 2023.
  11. ^ Grim, Ryan (9 August 2023). “Secret Pakistan Cable Documents United States. Pressure to Remove Imran Khan”. The Intercept. Archived from the original on 10 August 2023. Retrieved 6 February 2024.
  12. ^ “All institutions were on board over former PM’s Russia visit: DG ISPR”. ARY News. arynews.tv. 14 April 2022. Archived from the original on 14 April 2022. Retrieved 15 April 2022.
  13. ^ “Imran Khan advised President Alvi to dissolve assemblies”. 3 April 2022. Archived from the original on 11 April 2022. Retrieved 22 December 2023.
  14. ^ National Assembly of Pakistan (28 February 2012). “The Constitution of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan” (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 23 April 2022. Retrieved 10 April 2022.
  15. ^ “Imran Khan ousted as Pakistan’s PM after key vote”. BBC News. 9 April 2022. Archived from the original on 29 October 2022. Retrieved 22 December 2023.
  16. ^ “Imran Khan becomes first PM to be ousted via no-trust vote”. The Express Tribune. 9 April 2022. Archived from the original on 10 April 2022. Retrieved 9 April 2022.
  17. ^ Chaudhry, Fahad (9 April 2022). “Imran Khan loses no-trust vote, prime ministerial term comes to unceremonious end”. DAWN.COM. Archived from the original on 13 April 2022. Retrieved 9 April 2022.
  18. ^ “Live updates: NA votes out PM Imran Khan in a historic first for Pakistan”. www.thenews.com.pk. Archived from the original on 12 April 2022. Retrieved 9 April 2022.
  19. ^ “No-trust motion: Imran Khan becomes first prime minister to be voted out of pow”. Latest News – The Nation. Archived from the original on 9 April 2022. Retrieved 9 April 2022.
  20. ^ “Protests in Pakistan over Khan’s removal, Sharif set to be new PM”. www.aljazeera.com. 11 April 2022. Archived from the original on 13 April 2022. Retrieved 14 April 2022. Khan has claimed the US worked behind the scenes to bring him down, purportedly because of Washington’s displeasure over his independent foreign policy choices, which often favour China and Russia.
  21. ^ “Imran Khan supporters stage protests across Pakistan against his ouster as PM”. The Economic Times. 11 April 2022. Archived from the original on 14 April 2022. Retrieved 14 April 2022.
  22. ^ “Imran Khan supporters stage protests across Pakistan against his ouster as PM”. The New Indian Express. 11 April 2022. Archived from the original on 14 April 2022. Retrieved 14 April 2022.
  23. ^ “Shehbaz Sharif elected prime minister of Pakistan”. DAWN.COM. 11 April 2022. Archived from the original on 29 June 2023. Retrieved 6 February 2024.
  24. ^ “Pakistan: 100 PTI members resign from Parliament”. Hindustan Times. 12 April 2022. Archived from the original on 6 February 2024. Retrieved 6 February 2024.
  25. ^ “PDM govt leaves behind massive inflation”. The Express Tribune. 10 August 2023. Archived from the original on 7 February 2024. Retrieved 6 February 2024.
  26. ^ Kiani, Khaleeq (29 November 2023). “GDP figure under PDM rule ‘turns negative’“. DAWN.COM. Archived from the original on 6 February 2024. Retrieved 6 February 2024.
  27. ^ “Rupee plunges to all-time low against US dollar”. The Express Tribune. 24 August 2023. Archived from the original on 10 February 2024. Retrieved 6 February 2024.
  28. ^ “PTI supporters hold widescale rallies to protest against ‘foreign conspiracy’“. Business Recorder. 11 April 2022. Archived from the original on 8 February 2024. Retrieved 7 February 2024.
  29. ^ “Oct 16 by-polls: PTI wins majority of seats in all three provinces”. Business Recorder. 16 October 2022. Archived from the original on 26 April 2023. Retrieved 7 February 2024.
  30. ^ Ahmed, Imran (3 November 2022). “Interpreting Imran Khan’s Long March: Economy, Establishment and the Politics of Neutrality in Pakistan”. ISAS Singapore. Archived from the original on 8 February 2024. Retrieved 7 February 2024.
  31. ^ Baloch, Shah Meer (3 November 2022). “Imran Khan wounded in ‘assassination attempt’ in Pakistan”. The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Archived from the original on 10 October 2023. Retrieved 7 February 2024.
  32. ^ “Pakistan Delays Attempt to Arrest Imran Khan: Latest Updates”. TIME. 14 March 2023. Archived from the original on 28 September 2023. Retrieved 8 February 2024.
  33. ^ “ISPR warns Imran against hurling allegations against officer”. The Express Tribune. 8 May 2023. Archived from the original on 20 September 2023. Retrieved 8 February 2024.
  34. ^ Noack, Rick (10 May 2023). “Arrest of Imran Khan, Pakistan’s former prime minister, prompts violent clashes”. Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Archived from the original on 10 May 2023. Retrieved 8 February 2024.
  35. ^ a b Irfan, Wara (10 November 2023). “Six months to May 9: How PTI went from heights of popularity to facing obscurity”. DAWN.COM. Archived from the original on 7 February 2024. Retrieved 8 February 2024.
  36. ^ “Imran Khan loses his battle with Pakistan’s army”. The Economist. ISSN 0013-0613. Archived from the original on 4 February 2024. Retrieved 8 February 2024.
  37. ^ “Pakistan military trial of most of 103 May 9 suspects almost complete: Report”. The Economic Times. 16 January 2024. ISSN 0013-0389. Archived from the original on 10 February 2024. Retrieved 8 February 2024.
  38. ^ ‘PTI Parliamentarians’: Pervez Khattak officially launches new political party”. Business Recorder. 17 July 2023. Archived from the original on 5 February 2024. Retrieved 8 February 2024.
  39. ^ “JKT launches IPP as PTI defectors find new boss”. The Nation. 9 June 2023. Archived from the original on 26 October 2023. Retrieved 8 February 2024.
  40. ^ Demirhan, Meryem. “Pakistan provincial assembly dissolved on orders of former PM Khan”. TRT World. Archived from the original on 5 February 2024. Retrieved 5 February 2024.
  41. ^ Latif, Aamir. “Another provincial assembly dissolved in Pakistan as political situation deepens”. Anadolu Agency. Archived from the original on 5 February 2024. Retrieved 5 February 2024.
  42. ^ “Imran Khan says ‘constitution violated’ as Punjab vote is delayed”. Al Jazeera. Archived from the original on 5 February 2024. Retrieved 5 February 2024.
  43. ^ Khan, Iftikhar A. (11 March 2023). “Agencies caution ECP against holding polls at this point”. DAWN.COM. Archived from the original on 5 February 2024. Retrieved 5 February 2024.
  44. ^ Hussain, Abid. “Pakistan top court says provincial polls delay ‘unconstitutional’“. Al Jazeera. Archived from the original on 8 February 2024. Retrieved 5 February 2024.
  45. ^ Iqbal, Nasir (30 May 2023). “New law stalls Punjab polls case indefinitely”. DAWN.COM. Archived from the original on 5 February 2024. Retrieved 5 February 2024.
  46. ^ “National Assembly stands dissolve as President Alvi signs summary”. Ary News. 9 August 2023.
  47. ^ Khan, Sanaullah (9 August 2023). “Govt tenure comes to end as President Alvi signs off on NA dissolution”. DAWN.COM. Archived from the original on 9 August 2023. Retrieved 9 August 2023.
  48. ^ “Pakistan’s general election may be delayed by new census”. www.aljazeera.com. Archived from the original on 6 August 2023. Retrieved 6 August 2023.
  49. ^ Sadozai, Irfan (17 August 2023). “Election delay all but certain as ECP decides to go for fresh delimitation”. DAWN.COM. Archived from the original on 17 August 2023. Retrieved 17 August 2023.
  50. ^ Khan, Iftikhar A. (31 August 2023). “ECP ‘promises’ polls by mid-February, at the most”. DAWN.COM. Archived from the original on 31 August 2023. Retrieved 31 August 2023.
  51. ^ Sadozai, Irfan (13 September 2023). “President Alvi proposes Nov 6 as election date”. DAWN.COM. Archived from the original on 13 September 2023. Retrieved 13 September 2023.
  52. ^ Sadozai, Irfan; Guramani, Nadir; Bhatti, Haseeb; Momand, Abdullah (2 November 2023). “President, ECP agree on holding elections on Feb 8”. DAWN.COM. Archived from the original on 12 January 2024. Retrieved 2 November 2023.
  53. ^ “Pakistan sets elections for February 8”. Al Jazeera. 2 November 2023. Archived from the original on 14 November 2023. Retrieved 14 November 2023.
  54. ^ “New review law stuns top court”. The Express Tribune. 29 May 2023. Archived from the original on 11 August 2023. Retrieved 26 January 2024.
  55. ^ Sadozai, Irfan (25 June 2023). “NA passes bill limiting disqualification of lawmakers to five years”. DAWN.COM. Archived from the original on 28 December 2023. Retrieved 26 January 2024.
  56. ^ “Nawaz Sharif: Ex-PM leaves Pakistan for medical treatment”. BBC. 19 November 2019. Archived from the original on 26 January 2024. Retrieved 26 January 2024.
  57. ^ ‘Fugitive’ Sharif has lost right to audience: IHC”. The Express Tribune. 24 June 2021. Archived from the original on 2 August 2022. Retrieved 26 January 2024.
  58. ^ “Pakistan court grants protection from arrest to ex-leader Nawaz Sharif, allowing his return home”. AP News. 19 October 2023. Archived from the original on 26 January 2024. Retrieved 26 January 2024.
  59. ^ “Fugitive Ex-Pakistani PM Nawaz Sharif Returns From Self-Exile”. Voice of America. 21 October 2023. Archived from the original on 26 January 2024. Retrieved 26 January 2024.
  60. ^ Bhatti, Haseeb (8 January 2024). “SC rules against lifetime disqualification; Nawaz and Tareen eligible to contest polls”. DAWN.COM. Archived from the original on 26 January 2024. Retrieved 8 January 2024.
  61. ^ Bhatti, Haseeb (15 December 2017). “Imran Khan not out, Jahangir Tareen disqualified for being ‘dishonest’: Supreme Court”. DAWN.COM. Archived from the original on 19 January 2024. Retrieved 8 January 2024.
  62. ^ Hakeem, Abdul (10 January 2024). “PTI wins back ‘bat’ as PHC declares ECP order ‘illegal’“. DAWN.COM. Archived from the original on 6 February 2024. Retrieved 5 February 2024.
  63. ^ Bhatti, Haseeb (13 January 2024). “PTI bat-tered, loses iconic electoral symbol as SC restores ECP order”. DAWN.COM. Archived from the original on 13 January 2024. Retrieved 13 January 2024.
  64. ^ “PTI unveils ‘Plan C’ after election symbol setback”. Pakistan Recently. 15 January 2024.
  65. ^ ‘Huge blow to fundamental rights’: Lawyers, political experts in disbelief over SC’s decision to strip PTI of its electoral symbol”. DAWN.COM. 14 January 2024. Archived from the original on 21 January 2024. Retrieved 13 January 2024.
  66. ^ Burney, Umer (30 January 2024). “Imran Khan, Shah Mahmood Qureshi sentenced to 10 years in jail in cipher case”. DAWN.COM. Archived from the original on 6 February 2024. Retrieved 6 February 2024.
  67. ^ Burney, Umer (31 January 2024). “Imran Khan, Bushra Bibi sentenced to 14 years in Toshakhana reference”. DAWN.COM. Archived from the original on 6 February 2024. Retrieved 6 February 2024.
  68. ^ Sher, Fazal (4 February 2024). “Court convicts IK, Bushra for ‘illegal’ marriage”. Business Recorder. Archived from the original on 6 February 2024. Retrieved 6 February 2024.
  69. ^ “Imran Khan: Former Pakistan PM and wife Bushra Bibi jailed for corruption”. 31 January 2024. Archived from the original on 31 January 2024. Retrieved 6 February 2024.
  70. ^ “PTI vehemently rejects ‘kangaroo court’s judgement’“. Pakistan Recently. 30 January 2024.
  71. ^ Ahmad, Zulfiqar (4 February 2024). “Iddat case: PTI strongly reacts to verdict”. Business Recorder. Archived from the original on 6 February 2024. Retrieved 6 February 2024.
  72. ^ “Iddat case: Lawyers, civil society denounce ‘intellectual bankruptcy’ following Imran, Bushra’s conviction”. DAWN.COM. 3 February 2024. Archived from the original on 6 February 2024. Retrieved 6 February 2024.
  73. ^ “Controversial verdict of Imran’s marriage case crosses all limits: Farhatullah Babar”. Pakistan Recently. 4 February 2024.
  74. ^ “Feminists and lawyers lash out at Pakistan judge for hurting woman’s dignity in ‘un-Islamic’ marriage case verdict against Imran and wife”. The Times of India. 4 February 2024. ISSN 0971-8257. Archived from the original on 6 February 2024. Retrieved 6 February 2024.
  75. ^ “Imran Khan is convicted. Pakistan’s generals are content”. The Economist. ISSN 0013-0613. Archived from the original on 6 February 2024. Retrieved 6 February 2024.
  76. ^ a b “Pakistan’s Elections Are Being Brazenly Rigged. Why Doesn’t the United States. Seem to Care?”. TIME. 5 February 2024. Archived from the original on 6 February 2024. Retrieved 6 February 2024.
  77. ^ “With Imran Khan Jailed, Pakistan’s Election May Be Torpid, But the Aftermath Might Not Be”. Council on Foreign Relations. Archived from the original on 7 February 2024. Retrieved 7 February 2024.
  78. ^ a b “Polls close in Pakistan after millions vote in election marred by violence”. France 24. 8 February 2024. Archived from the original on 8 February 2024. Retrieved 8 February 2024.
  79. ^ “UN ‘Disturbed’ Over Pakistan’s Clampdown on Ex-PM Khan’s Party Ahead of Elections”. Voice of America. 6 February 2024. Archived from the original on 7 February 2024. Retrieved 8 February 2024.
  80. ^ “HRCP expresses concern over lack of level playing field in run-up to Feb 8 polls”. DAWN.COM. 1 January 2024. Archived from the original on 26 January 2024. Retrieved 26 January 2024.
  81. ^ Hussain, Abid. “‘Election engineering’: Is Pakistan’s February vote already rigged?”. Al Jazeera. Archived from the original on 15 January 2024. Retrieved 26 January 2024.
  82. ^ Baloch, Shah Meer; Ellis-Petersen, Hannah (29 November 2023). “Pakistan election commission accused of changing voting map to favour ex-PM”. The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Archived from the original on 7 February 2024. Retrieved 7 February 2024.
  83. ^ “Eggplants, Bottles, Beds: Pakistan Politicians Reclaim Election Symbols”. Barron’s. 2 February 2024. Archived from the original on 2 February 2024. Retrieved 3 February 2024.
  84. ^ a b “Pakistan elections 2024: Count underway after controversial election”. BBC. 8 February 2024. Archived from the original on 9 February 2024. Retrieved 9 February 2024.
  85. ^ “PTI says its websites ‘blocked’ in Pakistan ahead of Feb 8 polls”. DAWN.COM. 26 January 2024. Archived from the original on 26 January 2024. Retrieved 26 January 2024.
  86. ^ “Ex-PM Khan’s party says voter helpline, websites blocked ahead of elections this week”. Arab News. 6 February 2024. Retrieved 6 February 2024.
  87. ^ Sadozai, Irfan (7 January 2024). “Social media platforms across Pakistan face disruption amid PTI virtual fundraiser: Netblocks”. DAWN.COM. Archived from the original on 26 January 2024. Retrieved 26 January 2024.
  88. ^ “Nationwide disruption to social media platforms amid PTI virtual event: Netblocks”. DAWN.COM. 20 January 2024. Archived from the original on 26 January 2024. Retrieved 26 January 2024.
  89. ^ “Don’t cover Imran Khan’s PTI: Pakistan’s media told to censor popular ex-PM: Al Jazeera”. Al Jazeera. 20 January 2024. Archived from the original on 26 January 2024. Retrieved 26 January 2024.
  90. ^ “Pakistan: Election-day internet shutdown is a reckless attack on people’s rights”. 8 February 2024. Archived from the original on 9 February 2024. Retrieved 9 February 2024.
  91. ^ “Hafiz Naeemur Rehman says JI workers fired upon, injured outside polling stations”. Archived from the original on 9 February 2024. Retrieved 9 February 2024.
  92. ^ “Zartaj Gul Wazir reports misconduct in Punjab’s NA-185 constituency”. Archived from the original on 9 February 2024. Retrieved 9 February 2024.
  93. ^ “Saeed Ghani claims ballot papers snatched in Karachi’s PS-105”. Archived from the original on 9 February 2024. Retrieved 9 February 2024.
  94. ^ ECP decreases NA seats to 336 in the preliminary delimitation of constituencies Archived 16 July 2023 at the Wayback Machine GEO TV, 31 May 2022
  95. ^ “PM vows to defeat the ‘corrupt’“. The Express Tribune. 25 April 2021. Archived from the original on 25 June 2021. Retrieved 27 April 2021.
  96. ^ “Elections 2024: Comprehensive overview of Forms 45-49”. The Nation. 7 February 2024. Archived from the original on 8 February 2024. Retrieved 10 February 2024.
  97. ^ Khan, Iftikhar A. (2 July 2023). “ECP asks political parties to apply for election symbols”. DAWN. Archived from the original on 15 August 2023. Retrieved 15 August 2023.
  98. ^ a b c “Pakistan elections 2024: Polls close in a vote marred by internet cut”. BBC. 8 February 2024. Archived from the original on 8 February 2024. Retrieved 8 February 2024.
  99. ^ Khan, Iftikhar A. (20 September 2023). “11.7m women added to the voter list, but the vast gender gap remains”. DAWN. Archived from the original on 20 September 2023. Retrieved 20 September 2023.
  100. ^ Sadozai, Irfan (19 September 2023). “Number of registered voters in Pakistan rises by 21m in four years”. DAWN. Archived from the original on 20 September 2023. Retrieved 20 September 2023.
  101. ^ Khan, Iftikhar A. (29 September 2023). “Citizens allowed to amend voting information till Oct 25”. DAWN. Archived from the original on 30 September 2023. Retrieved 30 September 2023.
  102. ^ “President, ECP agree on holding elections on February 8”. DAWN. 2 November 2023. Archived from the original on 2 November 2023. Retrieved 2 November 2023.
  103. ^ “ECP issues schedule for Feb 8 general elections”. 15 December 2023. Archived from the original on 15 December 2023. Retrieved 15 December 2023.
  104. ^ “Two more days granted for polls nominations”. 22 December 2023. Archived from the original on 22 December 2023. Retrieved 25 December 2023.
  105. ^ “Mumtaz Bhutto reinvents himself, acts to strengthen anti-PPP front”. DAWN.COM. 11 May 2012. Archived from the original on 12 October 2012. Retrieved 10 February 2024.
  106. ^ “ECP code bars media from entry, exit polls”. DAWN. 15 August 2023. Archived from the original on 15 August 2023. Retrieved 15 August 2023.
  107. ^ “Pakistan holds election tainted by rigging claims”. BBC. 8 February 2024. Archived from the original on 8 February 2024. Retrieved 8 February 2024.
  108. ^ Baloch, Shah Meer (7 February 2024). “At least 30 killed in two bombings at election offices in Pakistan”. The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Archived from the original on 7 February 2024. Retrieved 7 February 2024.
  109. ^ “Pakistani Taliban pledge not to attack election rallies ahead of Feb. 8 vote”. Associated Press. 25 January 2024. Archived from the original on 25 January 2024. Retrieved 25 January 2024.
  110. ^ “Pakistan election candidate shot dead as violence escalates ahead of nationwide vote”. CNN. 1 February 2024. Archived from the original on 5 February 2024. Retrieved 5 February 2024.
  111. ^ “Bombings at Pakistani political offices kill at least 29 a day before parliamentary elections”. Associated Press. 7 February 2024. Archived from the original on 7 February 2024. Retrieved 7 February 2024.
  112. ^ “Bomb blasts kill dozens day before Pakistan vote”. BBC News. 7 February 2024. Archived from the original on 7 February 2024. Retrieved 7 February 2024.
  113. ^ “Pakistan to close border with Iran, Afghanistan to ensure peaceful elections amid militant attacks”. 8 February 2024. Archived from the original on 8 February 2024. Retrieved 8 February 2024.
  114. ^ “Pakistan closes borders with Iran, Afghanistan on elections”. 8 February 2024. Archived from the original on 8 February 2024. Retrieved 8 February 2024.
  115. ^ “Pakistan suspends mobile service for election day”. France 24. 8 February 2024. Archived from the original on 8 February 2024. Retrieved 8 February 2024.
  116. ^ “Pakistan votes for a new parliament as militant attacks surge and jailed leader’s party cries foul”. Associated Press. 8 February 2024. Archived from the original on 8 February 2024. Retrieved 8 February 2024.
  117. ^ “Two Killed In Election Unrest In Northwest Pakistan: Police”. Barron’s. 9 February 2024. Archived from the original on 9 February 2024. Retrieved 9 February 2024.
  118. ^ “In shock result, allies of jailed ex-leader Khan win most seats in Pakistan election”. CNN. 9 February 2024. Archived from the original on 10 February 2024. Retrieved 10 February 2024.
  119. ^ “Elections 2024: Mohsin Dawar injured in alleged Police firing incident”. Samaa. 10 February 2024. Archived from the original on 10 February 2024. Retrieved 10 February 2024.
  120. ^ “Six People Including Cop Killed in Larkana: Report”. We News. 11 February 2024. Retrieved 11 February 2024.
  121. ^ “PTI’s independents surge”. The Express Tribune. 9 February 2024. Archived from the original on 10 February 2024. Retrieved 9 February 2024.
  122. ^ “Pakistan election results show tight race with a long way to go”. Nikkei Asia. Archived from the original on 10 February 2024. Retrieved 9 February 2024.
  123. ^ “ECP instructs Provincial Election Commissioners, ROs to announce results within 30 minutes”. 9 February 2024. Archived from the original on 9 February 2024. Retrieved 9 February 2024.
  124. ^ “PTI-Backed Candidate Basharat Alleges Discrepancy Between Form 45 And Form 47”. DAWN.COM. 9 February 2024. Archived from the original on 10 February 2024. Retrieved 9 February 2024.
  125. ^ “Delays in Pakistan poll results, Imran Khan’s party alleges mass rigging”. The Economic Times. 9 February 2024. ISSN 0013-0389. Archived from the original on 10 February 2024. Retrieved 9 February 2024.
  126. ^ “Pakistan election results: Pakistan election count close amid rigging allegations”. BBC News. 9 February 2024. Archived from the original on 9 February 2024. Retrieved 9 February 2024.
  127. ^ “Pakistan polls: PTI alleges election tampering, claims votes ‘stolen”. The Times of India. Archived from the original on 9 February 2024. Retrieved 9 February 2024.
  128. ^ “LHC suspends RO’s Form-47 prepared in Raja’s absence”. The Express Tribune. 9 February 2024. Retrieved 9 February 2024.
  129. ^ “Haleem Adil challenges results of NA-238 in SHC”. GNN. 10 February 2024. Archived from the original on 10 February 2024. Retrieved 10 February 2024.
  130. ^ Shah, Rizwan. “PTI-Backed Independent Candidates Challenge Election Results in LHC and IHC”. bnnbreaking.com. Archived from the original on 10 February 2024. Retrieved 10 February 2024.
  131. ^ “Candidates move PHC against alleged rigging”. www.thenews.com.pk. Archived from the original on 10 February 2024. Retrieved 10 February 2024.
  132. ^ “Imran declares election victory in AI-generated message”. The Express Tribune. 9 February 2024. Archived from the original on 9 February 2024. Retrieved 9 February 2024.
  133. ^ “Imran claims PTI-backed candidates have clinched two-third majority”. Archived from the original on 9 February 2024. Retrieved 9 February 2024.
  134. ^ “PTI-linked independents take Pakistan election lead as counting nears end”. Al Jazeera. 10 February 2024. Archived from the original on 10 February 2024. Retrieved 10 February 2024.
  135. ^ “Independent candidates backed by ex-PM Khan’s party lead as Pakistan announces election results”. Associated Press. 9 February 2024. Archived from the original on 9 February 2024. Retrieved 9 February 2024.
  136. ^ “Election Commission Of Pakistan System Is Not Dependent On Internet: CEC”. DAWN.COM. 8 February 2024. Archived from the original on 10 February 2024. Retrieved 9 February 2024.
  137. ^ “Communication problems cause results to delay: Interior Ministry”. 9 February 2024. Archived from the original on 10 February 2024. Retrieved 10 February 2024.
  138. ^ “Pakistan mobile network being restored after day-long election blackout”. The Business Standard. 8 February 2024. Archived from the original on 9 February 2024. Retrieved 10 February 2024.
  139. ^ Siddiqui, Faras Ghani. “Pakistan election results 2024 live: No clear winner as counting goes on”. Al Jazeera. Archived from the original on 9 February 2024. Retrieved 9 February 2024.
  140. ^ Lipika Pelham; Caroline Davies. “Pakistan election: Pact may shut out Imran Khan supporters”. BBC. Retrieved 12 February 2024.
  141. ^ Goldbaum, Christina; ur-Rehman, Zia (9 February 2024). “Pakistan Election Surprise: Imran Khan’s Party Puts Up a Fight”. The New York Times. Archived from the original on 10 February 2024. Retrieved 10 February 2024.
  142. ^ Goldbaum, Christina (10 February 2024). “Shocking Opposition Victory Throws Pakistan Into Chaos”. The New York Times. Archived from the original on 10 February 2024. Retrieved 10 February 2024.
  143. ^ “Allies of ex-premier Imran Khan secure biggest share of seats in Pakistan’s final election tally”. Washington Post. 11 February 2024. Retrieved 11 February 2024.
  144. ^ “The ‘generals’ elections’ in Pakistan that turned against the military”. France 24. 9 February 2024. Archived from the original on 10 February 2024. Retrieved 10 February 2024.
  145. ^ “Pakistan’s Military Couldn’t Keep Imran Khan Down. Now What?”. TIME. 9 February 2024. Archived from the original on 10 February 2024. Retrieved 10 February 2024.
  146. ^ Grim, Ryan (9 February 2024). “Historic Turnout in Pakistan Is Swamping the Military’s Effort to Rig the Election”. The Intercept. Archived from the original on 9 February 2024. Retrieved 10 February 2024.
  147. ^ “Confusion reigns in Pakistan’s rigged election”. The Economist. Archived from the original on 10 February 2024. Retrieved 10 February 2024.
  148. ^ “Pakistan army chief calls for unity as election fails to produce clear winner”. The Guardian. 10 February 2024. Archived from the original on 10 February 2024. Retrieved 10 February 2024.
  149. ^ “The Observer view on Pakistan voters’ rejection of military rule: a victory for democracy”. The Observer. 11 February 2024. Retrieved 11 February 2024.
  150. ^ “Pakistan plunges into power vacuum after Imran Khan defies election odds from jail”. www.ft.com. Retrieved 11 February 2024.
  151. ^ Reilly, Patrick (11 February 2024). “Pakistani party backed by jailed ex-prime minister wins most seats in parliament”. Retrieved 11 February 2024.
  152. ^ “Imran Khan’s party defied the odds in Pakistan election with strong showing”. CBC News. 11 February 2024. Retrieved 11 February 2024.
  153. ^ “Pakistan election results seem to be blowing up in the military establishment’s face”. Dhaka Tribune. 10 February 2024. Archived from the original on 10 February 2024. Retrieved 10 February 2024.
  154. ^ “Pakistan army urges unity as ex-PMs both declare election win”. 10 February 2024. Archived from the original on 10 February 2024. Retrieved 10 February 2024.
  155. ^ “Have the Pakistan Elections Made the Country’s Crisis Worse?”. The Wire. 11 February 2024. Retrieved 11 February 2024.
  156. ^ “Vantage: Why Pak poll results are about vote against army and power of tech”. Firstpost. 10 February 2024. Retrieved 11 February 2024.
  157. ^ “Pakistan polls: How another weak coalition in Islamabad will open a floodgate of issues for India”. Firstpost. 11 February 2024. Retrieved 11 February 2024.
  158. ^ Cite error: The named reference TOI/11feb24 was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  159. ^ “Confusion in Pakistan: What happens now?”. The Indian Express. 10 February 2024. Retrieved 11 February 2024.
  160. ^ Banerji, Rana (11 February 2024). “Election surprise in Pakistan and what it means for India”. Deccan Herald. Retrieved 11 February 2024.
  161. ^ “Elections postponed in NA-8, PK-22 and PK-91”. Dunya News. 1 February 2024. Archived from the original on 2 February 2024. Retrieved 2 February 2024.
  162. ^ “Pakistan orders election rerun at dozens of polling stations amid rigging claims, international concerns”. Arab News. 11 February 2024. Retrieved 10 February 2024.
  163. ^ “ECP issues invitation for foreign election observers”. The Nation. 25 October 2023.
  164. ^ “81 foreign journalists, 38 observers seeking visas for Pakistan elections — minister”. Arab News.
  165. ^ “General elections: 49 foreign journalists issued visas so far: govt”. Brecorder. 24 January 2024.
  166. ^ “49 foreign journalists issued visas for coverage of elections: Solangi”. The News International. 24 January 2024.
  167. ^ “37 British journalists issued visas to cover Pakistan elections | Pakistan Recently”.
  168. ^ “Pakistan voting ends; results expected soon amid charges of manipulation”. Aljazeera. 8 February 2024. Archived from the original on 9 February 2024. Retrieved 9 February 2024.
  169. ^ “ECP chief commends successful election”. 8 February 2024. Archived from the original on 8 February 2024. Retrieved 9 February 2024.
  170. ^ ‘Peaceful elections’ expected to strengthen democracy in country: ISPR”. 8 February 2024. Archived from the original on 10 February 2024. Retrieved 9 February 2024.
  171. ^ “Pakistan election: Imran Khan and Nawaz Sharif each claim advantage”. BBC. 10 February 2024. Archived from the original on 10 February 2024. Retrieved 10 February 2024.
  172. ^ “Alvi says use of EVMs can’ve averted election uncertainty”. The Express Tribune. 10 February 2024. Archived from the original on 10 February 2024. Retrieved 10 February 2024.
  173. ^ a b Parkin, Benjamin; Bokhari, Farhan (10 February 2024). “Imran Khan’s allies accuse Pakistan officials of vote rigging”. Financial Times. Archived from the original on 10 February 2024. Retrieved 10 February 2024.
  174. ^ “Criticism by foreign capitals, orgs neither constructive nor objective: FO”. 10 February 2024.
  175. ^ “FO surprised at negative tone of certain countries’ statements over general elections”. 10 February 2024.
  176. ^ “Pakistan stock market sheds over 2,200 points on opening after unexpected poll results — analysts”. Arab News. 9 February 2024. Retrieved 9 February 2024.
  177. ^ “Respect the mandate”. DAWN. 10 February 2024.
  178. ^ “A vote for democracy”. The Express Tribune. 9 February 2024.
  179. ^ ” Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade. Retrieved 11 February 2024.
  180. ^ “EU urges Pakistan to ensure full probe of election irregularities”. The Express Tribune. 9 February 2024. Archived from the original on 9 February 2024. Retrieved 9 February 2024.
  181. ^ “UK acknowledges ‘serious concerns’ about election ‘fairness’“. The Express Tribune. 9 February 2024. Archived from the original on 9 February 2024. Retrieved 9 February 2024.
  182. ^ “US questions conduct of Pakistan election, calls for ‘fraud’ probe”. Pakistan Recently. 9 February 2024.
  183. ^ “Pak Elections: US lawmakers condemn violence, restrictions on free speech”. Business Standard. 9 February 2024. Archived from the original on 9 February 2024. Retrieved 9 February 2024.
  184. ^ “US lawmakers advise Biden against recognising Pakistan elections results”. www.geo.tv. 11 February 2024. Retrieved 11 February 2024.
  185. ^ Jha, Lalit K. (10 February 2024). “Pakistani military ‘rigging’ elections to ‘prop up’ its candidate despite Imran Khan-backed candidates winning polls: Congressman Khanna”. ThePrint. Retrieved 11 February 2024.

Disasters Expo USA, is proud to be supported by Inergency for their next upcoming edition on March 6th & 7th 2024!

The leading event mitigating the world’s most costly disasters is returning to the Miami Beach

Convention Center and we want you to join us at the industry’s central platform for emergency management professionals.
Disasters Expo USA is proud to provide a central platform for the industry to connect and
engage with the industry’s leading professionals to better prepare, protect, prevent, respond
and recover from the disasters of today.
Hosting a dedicated platform for the convergence of disaster risk reduction, the keynote line up for Disasters Expo USA 2024 will provide an insight into successful case studies and
programs to accurately prepare for disasters. Featuring sessions from the likes of The Federal Emergency Management Agency,
NASA, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration, NOAA, The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, TSA and several more this event is certainly providing you with the knowledge
required to prepare, respond and recover to disasters.
With over 50 hours worth of unmissable content, exciting new features such as their Disaster
Resilience Roundtable, Emergency Response Live, an Immersive Hurricane Simulation and
much more over just two days, you are guaranteed to gain an all-encompassing insight into
the industry to tackle the challenges of disasters.
By uniting global disaster risk management experts, well experienced emergency
responders and the leading innovators from the world, the event is the hub of the solutions
that provide attendees with tools that they can use to protect the communities and mitigate
the damage from disasters.
Tickets for the event are $119, but we have been given the promo code: HUGI100 that will
enable you to attend the event for FREE!

So don’t miss out and register today: https://shorturl.at/aikrW

And in case you missed it, here is our ultimate road trip playlist is the perfect mix of podcasts, and hidden gems that will keep you energized for the entire journey

-

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Accept Read More