List of Falcon 9 and Falcon Heavy launches: Difference between revisions – Wikipedia

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List of Falcon 9 and Falcon Heavy launches: Difference between revisions – Wikipedia


 

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| colspan=”9″ | ”Plankton, Aerosol, Cloud, ocean Ecosystem” is a 1.7 tonne, US$800 million craft that will orbit at {{cvt|676|km}} altitude. It will include the ”Ocean Color Imager” intended to study phytoplankton in the ocean, and two polarimeters for studying properties of clouds, aerosols and the ocean. The launch price was US$80.4 million.<ref>{{cite web |last=Clark |first=Stephen |url= |title=SpaceX wins contract to launch NASA, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s PACE Earth science mission |work=Spaceflight Now |date=5 February 2020 |access-date=3 May 2021}}</ref>

| colspan=”9″ | ”Plankton, Aerosol, Cloud, ocean Ecosystem” is a 1.7 tonne, US$800 million craft that will orbit at {{cvt|676|km}} altitude. It will include the ”Ocean Color Imager” intended to study phytoplankton in the ocean, and two polarimeters for studying properties of clouds, aerosols and the ocean. The launch price was US$80.4 million.<ref>{{cite web |last=Clark |first=Stephen |url= |title=SpaceX wins contract to launch NASA, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s PACE Earth science mission |work=Spaceflight Now |date=5 February 2020 |access-date=3 May 2021}}</ref>

|- id=”F9-297″

! rowspan=2 scope=”row” style=”text-align:center;” | 297

| 10 February 2024<br />00:34<ref>{{Cite web |date=10 February 2024 |title=SpaceX launches 22 Starlink satellites into orbit from California |url= |access-date=10 February 2024 |website=Space.com |language=en}}</ref>

| [[Falcon 9 Block 5|F9 B5]] ♺[[List of Falcon 9 first-stage boosters#B1071|B1071.14]]
| [[Vandenberg Space Force Base|VSFB]],[[Vandenberg Space Launch Complex 4|SLC-4E]]
| [[Starlink|Starlink Group 7-13]] (22 satellites)

| ~{{cvt|17600|kg}}

| [[Low Earth orbit|LEO]]

| {{Success}}

| {{Success}}<br /><small>{{nowrap|(drone ship)}}</small>

⚫ ⚫
| colspan=”” | A West Coast v2 mini Starlink launch to their Generation 2 network.

|}

|}

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! scope=”col” | Orbit

! scope=”col” | Orbit

! scope=”col” | Customer

! scope=”col” | Customer

| rowspan=”2″ | 10 February 2024<br />00:34<ref name=”nextSFupcoming” />

| [[Falcon 9 Block 5|F9 B5]] ♺[[List of Falcon 9 first-stage boosters#B1071|B1071.14]]
| [[Vandenberg Space Force Base|VSFB]],[[Vandenberg Space Launch Complex 4|SLC-4E]]
| [[Starlink|Starlink Group 7-13]] (22 satellites)
| [[Low Earth orbit|LEO]]

|-

| colspan=”5” | A West Coast v2 mini Starlink launch to their Generation 2 network.

|-

|-

SpaceX’s orbital rockets with reusable first stages

Left to right: Falcon 9 v1.0, v1.1, v1.2 “Full Thrust”, Falcon 9 Block 5, Falcon Heavy, and Falcon Heavy Block 5.

Since June 2010, rockets from the Falcon 9 family have been launched 305 times, with 303 full mission successes, two failures,[a] and one partial success. Designed and operated by SpaceX, the Falcon 9 family includes the retired versions Falcon 9 v1.0, v1.1, and v1.2 “Full Thrust” (blocks 3 and 4), along with the currently active Block 5 evolution. Falcon Heavy is a heavy-lift derivative of Falcon 9, combining a strengthened central core with two Falcon 9 first stages as side boosters.[1]

The Falcon design features reusable first-stage boosters, which land either on a ground pad near the launch site or on a drone ship at sea.[2] In December 2015, Falcon 9 became the first rocket to land propulsively after delivering a payload into orbit.[3] This reusability results in significantly reduced launch costs, as the cost of the first stage constitutes the majority of the cost of a new rocket.[4][5] Falcon family core boosters have successfully landed 270 times in 281 attempts. A total of 41 boosters have flown multiple missions, with a record of 19 missions by a single booster. SpaceX has also reflown fairing halves more than 300 times, with some being reflown for eleven or more times.[6]

Typical missions include launches of SpaceX’s Starlink satellites (accounting for a majority of the Falcon manifest), Dragon crew and cargo missions to the International Space Station, and launches of commercial and military satellites to LEO, polar, and geosynchronous orbits. The heaviest payloads launched on Falcon are batches of 23 Starlink V2-Mini satellites weighing 18,400 kg (40,600 lb) total, a common configuration first flown October 2023.[7] The heaviest payload launched to geostationary transfer orbit (GTO) was the 9,200 kg (20,300 lb) Jupiter-3 on 29 July 2023. Launches to higher-orbits have included DSCOVR to Sun–Earth Lagrange point L1, TESS to a lunar flyby, a Tesla Roadster to a heliocentric orbit extending past the orbit of Mars, DART to the asteroid Didymos, Euclid to Sun-Earth Lagrange point L2, and Psyche to the asteroid Psyche.

Launch statistics[edit]

Rockets from the Falcon 9 family have been launched 305 times over 14 years, resulting in 303 full successes (99.3%), one in-flight failure (SpaceX CRS-7), and one partial success (SpaceX CRS-1 delivered its cargo to the International Space Station (ISS), but a secondary payload was stranded in a lower-than-planned orbit). Additionally, one rocket and its payload AMOS-6 were destroyed before launch in preparation for an on-pad static fire test. The active version, Falcon 9 Block 5, has flown 240 missions, all full successes.

In 2022 Falcon 9 set a new record of 60 launches (all successful) by the same launch vehicle type in a calendar year. The previous record was held by Soyuz-U, which had 47 launches (45 successful) in 1979.[8]
In 2023 Falcon 9 family set a new record of 96 launches (all successful) by the same launch vehicle family in a calendar year. The previous record was held by R-7 rocket family, which had 63 launches (61 successful) in 1980.[b][9]

The first rocket version Falcon 9 v1.0 was launched five times from June 2010 to March 2013, its successor Falcon 9 v1.1 15 times from September 2013 to January 2016, and the Falcon 9 Full Thrust 276 times from December 2015 to present. The latest Full Thrust variant, Block 5, was introduced in May 2018.[10] While the Block 4 boosters were only flown twice and required several months of refurbishment, Block 5 versions were certified to sustain 10 flights and have since been recertified for 15 and then 20 flights per booster.[11] SpaceX is currently planning to further increase the Falcon re-flight certification to 40 flights per booster, once 20 flights is reached.[12]

The Falcon Heavy derivative consists of a strengthened Falcon 9 first stage as its center core, with two additional Falcon 9 first stages attached and used as boosters, both of which are fitted with an aerodynamic nosecone instead of a usual Falcon 9 interstage.[13]

Falcon 9 first-stage boosters landed successfully in 270 of 281 attempts (96.1%), with 245 out of 249 (98.4%) for the Falcon 9 Block 5 version. A total of 243 re-flights of first stage boosters have all successfully launched their payloads.

Rocket configurations[edit]

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

100

Launch sites[edit]

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

100

’10

’11

’12

’13

’14

’15

’16

’17

’18

’19

’20

’21

’22

’23

’24

Launch outcomes[edit]

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

100

’10

’11

’12

’13

’14

’15

’16

’17

’18

’19

’20

’21

’22

’23

’24

  •   Loss before launch
  •   Loss during flight
  •   Partial failure
  •   Success (commercial and government)
  •   Success (Starlink)
  •   Planned (commercial and government)
  •   Planned (Starlink)

Booster landings[edit]

’10

’11

’12

’13

’14

’15

’16

’17

’18

’19

’20

’21

’22

’23

’24

  •   Ground-pad failure
  •   Drone-ship failure
  •   Ocean test failure[i]
  •   Parachute test failure[ii]
  •   Ground-pad success
  •   Drone-ship success
  •   Ocean test success[iii]
  •   No attempt
  1. ^ Controlled descent; ocean touchdown control failed; no recovery
  2. ^ Passive reentry failed before parachute deployment
  3. ^ Controlled descent; soft vertical ocean touchdown; no recovery

Past launches[edit]

2010 to 2019[edit]

2020[edit]

In late 2019, Gwynne Shotwell stated that SpaceX hoped for as several as 24 launches for Starlink satellites in 2020,[14] in addition to 14 or 15 non-Starlink launches. At 26 launches, 14 of which were for Starlink satellites, Falcon 9 had its most prolific year, and Falcon rockets were second most prolific rocket family of 2020, only behind China’s Long March rocket family.[15]

2021[edit]

In October 2020, Elon Musk indicated he wanted to be able to increase launches to 48 in 2021.[131] Regulatory documents filed in February 2020, specified a maximum of 60 launches per year from Florida for Falcon 9 and another ten for Falcon Heavy, according to its 2020, environmental assessment.[132] 31 launches actually occurred in 2021; all were successful.[133]

2022[edit]

There were 61 Falcon launches in 2022: one Falcon Heavy and 60 Falcon 9. Older environmental regulatory documents had showed that, in addition to launches from Vandenberg, SpaceX mentioned planning for up to 70 launches each year from its two Florida launch sites when it filed an environmental assessment in February 2020.[132] In January 2022, information became public that SpaceX had intended to increase the pace of launches to 52 during 2022, after launching a record 31 times in 2021.[133] In March 2022, Elon Musk stated that SpaceX was aiming for 60 Falcon launches in 2022.[269] In the event, SpaceX did increase their launch cadence, exceeding the previous yearly record of 31 launches in just the first 29 weeks of 2022.[270] 13 of the Falcon 9 launches were from Vandenberg. SpaceX launched over 633 tonnes this year or 1.15 times the mass of a Falcon 9 rocket just before takeoff (exclusive of undisclosed payload masses).[271]

2023[edit]

SpaceX launched vehicles of the Falcon family 96 times (91 Falcon 9 and 5 Falcon Heavy launches) in 2023. SpaceX CEO, Elon Musk, and SpaceX President, Gwynne Shotwell, had stated in late 2022 and early 2023 respectively, that the company might attempt up to 100 Falcon launches in 2023.[455][456] In any event, SpaceX did increase their launch cadence, exceeding their previous yearly record of 61 launches and the previous yearly world record of 64 launches by a rocket family by September 2023. Then they went on to become the first[citation needed] family to complete 70 launches, 80 launches, 90 launches in a year by October, November and December 2023 respectively.[457] Notably, SpaceX completed 100 launches (including Starship, two of which have flown this year) in a consecutive 365 days (a year) time period between 8 December 2022, 22:27 UTC and 8 December 2023, 8:03 UTC.[458] Excluding undisclosed payload masses, SpaceX has launched over 1,238 tonnes of payload to orbit this year,[459] or 2.25 times the mass of a Falcon 9 rocket ready for takeoff.[460]

2024[edit]

As of , there have been 12 launches in 2024. Bill Gerstenmaier told the United States. Senate Commerce Committee’s space subcommittee in October 2023 that the company is targeting roughly 144 flights, or 12 flights per month, for 2024.[682] Kiko Dontchev stated that the launch system (pads, recovery, flight hardware) needs to be capable of 13 launches per month to catch up average launch cadence when planned maintenance, debacles and weather inevitably slows down the cadence.[683] Musk stated that SpaceX aims to increase the total launch mass to orbit by Falcon family by ~50% in 2024.[684] Later, John Edwards stated a slightly higher goal of 148 Falcon launches for this year at the 2024 Annual Astro Awards Ceremony organised by Tim Dodd.[685]

Future launches[edit]

Future launches are listed chronologically when firm plans are in place. The order of the later launches is much less certain, as the official SpaceX manifest does not include a schedule.[204] Tentative launch dates are cited from various sources for each launch.[710][711][712][713] Launches are expected to take place “no earlier than” (NET) the listed date. The number of Starlink satellites per launch indicated with an ~ is an expectation based on previous launches to the same orbit, as the exact number is rarely published more than three days in advance.

2024[edit]

Date and time (UTC) Version,
booster[c]
Launch site Payload[d] Orbit Customer
13 February 2024[713] F9 B5 ♺ VSFB,
SLC-4E
Starlink Group 7-14 (~22 satellites) LEO SpaceX
A West Coast v2 mini Starlink launch to their Generation 2 network.
14 February 2024[714]
05:57[713]
F9 B5 ♺
B1060.18
KSC,
LC-39A
IM-1 Nova-C Odysseus lander TLI NASA, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (CLPS)
Intuitive Machines
Second mission of NASA, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s Commercial Lunar Payload Services program, and might be the first private American company to land a spacecraft on the Moon. The lander is expected to carry five payloads of up to 100 kg (220 lb) total (LRA, NDL, LN-1, SCALPSS, and ROLSES) and transmit data from the lunar surface in a mission lasting 2 weeks.[715][716][717] The LC-39A’s Transporter erector is modified to fuel liquid oxygen and liquid methane onto the lander alongside Falcon 9 fueling operations, shortly before liftoff.[718]
14 February 2024
~22:30[713][719]
F9 B5 ♺ CCSFS, SLC-40 USSF-124[720] LEO USSF
Launch part of Phase 2 US Space Force contract awarded in 2022.
20 February 2024[712][721] F9 B5 ♺ CCSFS, SLC-40 Telkomsat HTS 113BT[722][723] GTO? Thales Alenia
Telkom Indonesia
To provide more capacity over Indonesia.
22 February 2024
08:11[724][725]
F9 B5
B1083.1
KSC,
LC-39A
Crew-8 (Crew Dragon C206.5 Endeavour ♺)[611] LEO (ISS) NASA, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (CTS)[22]
After first six Crew Dragon launches of NASA, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration USCV award, a further three missions for SpaceX were announced on 3 December 2021. These launches carry up to four astronauts and 100 kg (220 lb) of cargo to the ISS as well as feature a lifeboat function to evacuate astronauts from ISS in case of an emergency.[22]
24 February 2024[712] F9 B5 ♺ CCSFS, SLC-40 Starlink Group 6-39 (~23 satellites) LEO SpaceX
An East Coast v2 mini Starlink launch to their Generation 2 network.
1 March 2024[726] F9 B5 VSFB,
SLC-4E
Transporter-10, SmallSat Rideshare[727] SSO Various
Dedicated SmallSat Rideshare mission to sun-synchronous orbit.
March 2024[728] F9 B5 CC,
SLC-40/LC-39A
MicroGEO (4 satellites)[729] GEO Astranis
Dedicated Falcon 9 launch to put four Astranis MicroGEO communications satellites into service in 2023.[729] The MicroGEOs will be launched to a custom geostationary orbit, with the four satellites individually conducting on-orbit maneuvers to inject themselves into their orbital slots. However, it is unclear whether this will be a direct to geostationary orbit insertion, or an optimized geostationary transfer orbit. The four spacecraft will be mounted to a standard adapter ring, known as an ESPA-Grande, for ease of deployment.
Late March 2024[730] F9 B5 VSFB,
SLC-4E
USSF-62 (WSF-M 1)[731][720] LEO USSF
Launch part of Phase 2 US Space Force contract awarded in 2022. Mission will launch the first Weather System Follow-on Microwave weather satellite, which will replace the aging Defense Meteorological Satellite Program satellites.
Q2 2024[732] F9 B5 VSFB or CC BlueBird Block 1 (5 Satellites)[733] LEO AST SpaceMobile
Cellphone-compatible broadband constellation. Each satellite is to be a similar size and weight to its 1,500-kilogram BlueWalker 3 prototype and have a 64 square meter phased array antenna.
1 April 2024 F9 B5 VSFB or CC Bandwagon-1, SmallSat Rideshare[727][734] LEO Various
Dedicated SmallSat Rideshare mission to 45 degree inclination 550–600 km altitude.
4 April 2024[735] F9 B5 CC,
SLC-40 / LC-39A
SpaceX CRS-30[736] LEO (ISS) NASA, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (CRS)
Six additional CRS-2 missions for Dragon 2 were announced in March 2022, resupplying the ISS until 2026.
April 2024[737] F9 B5 TBD Galileo-L12 (2 Satellites) MEO ESA
First Galileo satellites booked on a US rocket following delays to the European Ariane 6 program.
30 April 2024[738] Falcon Heavy B5
B1087 (core)
KSC,
LC-39A
GOES-U[739] GEO NOAA, The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
B1072.1 (side)
B1086.1 (side)
In September 2021, NASA, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration awarded SpaceX a $152.5 million contract to provide launch services for the GOES-U weather satellite.
April 2024 F9 B5 VSFB or CC 425 Project SAR satellite flight 2[740] SSO? Republic of Korea Armed Forces
A military satellite of South Korea with a mass of ~800 kg.
May 2024[741][742] F9 B5 VSFB or CC EarthCARE[743] ESA
EarthCARE (Cloud, Aerosol and Radiation Explorer) satellite is the sixth mission in ESA’s Earth Explorer program and it aims to advance our understanding of the role clouds and aerosols play in reflecting incident solar radiation back into space and trapping infrared radiation emitted from Earth’s surface.
1 June 2024 F9 B5 VSFB or CC Transporter-11, SmallSat Rideshare[727] SSO Various
Dedicated SmallSat Rideshare mission to sun-synchronous orbit.
June 2024[744] F9 B5 CC,
SLC-40/LC-39A
Nusantara Lima[745] GTO? PT Pasifik Satelit Nusantara
A hot backup system for SATRIA-1.[746]
June 2024[747] F9 B5 CC,
SLC-40/LC-39A
Türksat 6A[748] GTO Türksat
First domestically produced Turkish communications satellite.
June 2024[749] F9 B5 CC,
SLC-40 / LC-39A
SpaceX CRS-31[736] LEO (ISS) NASA, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (CRS)
Six additional CRS-2 missions for Dragon 2 were announced in March 2022, resupplying the ISS until 2026.
June 2024[750] F9 B5 KSC,
LC-39A[751]
IM-2 Nova-C lunar lander[752]
Sherpa-ES
TLI NASA, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (CLPS)
Intuitive Machines
Spaceflight, Inc.
Intuitive Machines is sending its second lander aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9, with a projected launch time frame in 2024. Intuitive Machines has already booked a first lander mission via SpaceX, which is also hosting payloads for other private companies seeking to make lunar landfall under NASA, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s Commercial Lunar Payload Services program. NASA, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s PRIME-1 is expected to be included.[753] The Sherpa-ES Go Beyond orbital transfer vehicle will deploy rideshare payloads to trans-lunar orbit, low-lunar orbit and beyond to GEO.[754][755][756] NASA, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s Lunar Trailblazer mission will fly as a secondary payload on this mission.[757]
Q2 2024[713][732] F9 B5 VSFB or CC BlueBird Block 1 (5 Satellites)[733] LEO AST SpaceMobile
Cellphone-compatible broadband constellation. Each satellite is to be a similar size and weight to its 1,500-kilogram BlueWalker 3 prototype and have a 64 square meter phased array antenna.
Q2? 2024[713] F9 B5 ♺[758] VSFB,
SLC-4E[711]
WorldView Legion 1 & 2 Mission 1 (2 satellites)[758] SSO Maxar Technologies
Two Maxar Technologies satellites built by subsidiary SSL for subsidiary DigitalGlobe.[758]
July 2024[737] F9 B5 TBD 2× Galileo MEO ESA
Second launch of Galileo satellites.
Q2 2024[759] F9 B5 CC,
SLC-40/LC-39A
GSAT-20[760] (CMS-03) GTO New Space India Limited[760]
Dish TV[761]
Indian telecommunications satellite for Dish TV. Originally planned to launch on ISRO’s LVM3,[762] but later shifted to Falcon 9 due to mass and scheduling issues.[759] It will be the first ISRO-made satellite to move from geostationary transfer orbit to geosynchronous orbit using electric propulsion.[763]
Q2 2024[752] F9 B5 KSC,
LC-39A
IM-3 Nova-C lunar lander TLI NASA, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (CLPS)
Intuitive Machines
Third mission for Intuitive Machines, with multiple rideshare payloads.[764] This mission was selected by NASA, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration under the CLPS program in November 2021.[765][766]
H1 2024[713][767] F9 B5[768] CC,
SLC-40/LC-39A
NROL-69 TBA USSF
Launch part of Phase 2 US Space Force contract awarded in 2021.[769]
H1 2024[770][771] F9 B5 KSC,
LC-39A
Blue Ghost M1 TLI Firefly Aerospace
NASA, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (CLPS)
Firefly Aerospace has selected SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket to deliver the Blue Ghost lunar lander to the lunar surface.[772] Blue Ghost will carry 10 payloads for NASA, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s Commercial Lunar Payload Services task order 19D mission along with other separately contracted payloads.[773]
Mid 2024[774][775] F9 B5 VSFB,
SLC-4E
ASBM 1 (GX 10A),[776] ASBM 2 (GX 10B) HEO Space Norway / Inmarsat
Space Norway will launch 2 satellites of the Arctic Satellite Broadband Mission (ASBM) system into highly elliptical orbits (apogee: 43,509 km (27,035 mi), perigee: 8,089 km (5,026 mi), 63.4° inclination)[777] to provide communication coverage to high latitudes not served by geosynchronous satellites.[778]
Summer 2024[779][780] F9 B5 KSC,
LC-39A
Polaris Dawn[781]
(Crew Dragon C207.3 Resilience ♺ )
LEO Jared Isaacman / Polaris Program
First of two Crew Dragon missions for the Polaris Program. Crew will consist of Jared Isaacman, Scott Poteet, Sarah Gillis and Anna Menon and will spend up to five days in orbit. Flying higher than any crewed Earth orbiting spacecraft has ever flown, Polaris Dawn will conduct research with the aim of better understanding the effects of spaceflight and space radiation on human health. At approximately 500 kilometers above the Earth, the crew will attempt the first-ever commercial extravehicular activity (EVA) with SpaceX-designed EVA spacesuits, derived from the existing intravehicular (IVA) suit.
Mid August 2024[782] F9 B5 ♺ CC,
SLC-40/LC-39A
Crew-9[611] LEO (ISS) NASA, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (CTS)[22]
After first six Crew Dragon launches of NASA, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration USCV award, a further three missions for SpaceX were announced on 3 December 2021. These launches carry up to four astronauts and 100 kg (220 lb) of cargo to the ISS as well as feature a lifeboat function to evacuate astronauts from ISS in case of an emergency.[22]
August 2024[783][784] F9 B5 KSC,
LC-39A
Ax-4[555] LEO (ISS) Axiom Space
Contract for 3 additional missions was signed in June 2021.
Summer 2024[785] F9 B5 CC,
SLC-40 / LC-39A
Spainsat-NG I[786] GTO Hisdesat
Communications satellite built on the Eurostar-Neo platform, to be utilized by the Spanish government and its allies.[787] First of two launches for the Spainsat-NG program.
September 2024[788] F9 B5 VSFB,
SLC-4E
SDA Tranche 1 Tracking layer T1TL-B[789] Polar LEO SDA
Launch part of Phase 2 US Space Force contract awarded in 2022.
8 October 2024[580] F9 B5 CCSFS, SLC-40 Hera with Juventas and Milani Heliocentric ESA
Hera is a space mission in development at the European Space Agency in its Space Safety program. Its primary objective is to study the Didymos binary asteroid system that was impacted by DART and contribute to validation of the kinetic impact method to deviate a near-Earth asteroid in a colliding trajectory with Earth. It will measure the size and the morphology of the crater created by and momentum transferred by an artificial projectile impacting an asteroid, which will allow measuring the efficiency of the deflection produced by the impact. It will also carry two nano-satellite CubeSats, called Milani and Juventas.
10 October 2024 Falcon Heavy B5
B10xx (core)
KSC,
LC-39A
Europa Clipper Heliocentric NASA, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration
B1064.6 ♺ (side)[790]
B1065.6 ♺ (side)[790]
Europa Clipper will conduct a detailed survey of Europa and use a sophisticated suite of science instruments to investigate whether the icy moon has conditions suitable for life. Key mission objectives are to produce high-resolution images of Europa’s surface, determine its composition, look for signs of recent or ongoing geological activity, measure the thickness of the moon’s icy shell, search for subsurface lakes, and determine the depth and salinity of Europa’s ocean.[791] The mission will fly past Mars and Earth before arriving at Jupiter in April 2030.[792][793] The side boosters and the center core will all be expended.
October 2024[727] F9 B5 VSFB or CC Transporter-12, SmallSat Rideshare SSO Various
Dedicated SmallSat Rideshare mission to sun-synchronous orbit.
October 2024[788] F9 B5 VSFB,
SLC-4E
SDA Tranche 1 Tracking layer T1TL-C[789] Polar LEO SDA
Launch part of Phase 2 US Space Force contract awarded in 2022.
November 2024[794] Falcon Heavy B5 KSC,
LC-39A
Griffin Mission 1[795] TLI Astrobotic
NASA, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (Artemis)
Astrobotic’s Griffin lunar lander will deliver NASA, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s VIPER spacecraft to the lunar south pole. Recovery method is unconfirmed, but can possibly feature the first Falcon Heavy center core recovery attempt since STP-2.[796]
November 2024 F9 B5 VSFB or CC Bandwagon-2, SmallSat Rideshare[727][734] LEO Various
Dedicated SmallSat Rideshare mission to 45 degree inclination 550–600 km altitude.
November 2024[788] F9 B5 VSFB,
SLC-4E
SDA Tranche 1 Tracking layer T1TL-D[789] Polar LEO SDA
Launch part of Phase 2 US Space Force contract awarded in 2022.
November 2024 F9 B5 VSFB or CC 425 Project SAR satellite flight 3[740] SSO? Republic of Korea Armed Forces
A military satellite of South Korea with a mass of ~800 kg.
December 2024[788] F9 B5 VSFB,
SLC-4E
SDA Tranche 1 Tracking layer T1TL-E[789] Polar LEO SDA
Launch part of Phase 2 US Space Force contract awarded in 2022.
Q4 2024[788] F9 B5 VSFB,
SLC-4E
SDA Tranche 1 Transport layer T1TR-C[789] Polar LEO SDA
Launch part of Phase 2 US Space Force contract awarded in 2022.
Q4 2024[797] F9 B5 CC,
SLC-40/LC-39A
Koreasat 6A[798] GTO KT Sat
South Korean communications satellite built on the Spacebus-4000B2 platform. To be positioned at 116° East.[799]
H2 2024[713][767] F9 B5[768] CC,
SLC-40/LC-39A[800]
USSF-36 TBA USSF
Launch part of Phase 2 US Space Force contract awarded in 2021.[769]
H2 2024[801] F9 B5 CC,
SLC-40/LC-39A
O3b mPOWER 7 & 8 MEO SES
In August 2020, SES expanded the O3b mPOWER contract with two additional launches, raising the number of satellites from 7 to 11 satellites at nearly 2 tons each.[802][803] In October 2023 the mission was delayed to the second half of 2024 due to electrical issues discovered in the first four satellites of the constellation.[801]
2024[713] F9 B5 ♺ KSC,
LC-39A
DOGE-1 Possible rideshare TLI Geometric Energy
Originally expected to be a secondary rideshare payload on IM-1 mission but the 40 kg was later postponed to a later date due to incomplete radio and launch requirements.>[804][non-primary source needed]
2024[805] F9 B5 Unknown ispace 2nd lunar lander[806] TLI ispace
Second lunar lander built by Japanese company ispace.
2024[807] F9 B5 CC,
SLC-40 / LC-39A
Thuraya 4-NGS GTO Thuraya
Planned replacement for Thuraya 2.[808]
2024 F9 B5 CC,
SLC-40 / LC-39A
CRS NG-21 (Cygnus (enhanced))[705] LEO (ISS) Northrop Grumman (CRS)
Second of three launches Northrop Grumman acquired from SpaceX while a replacement engine is developed for its Antares rocket.
2024 F9 B5 CC,
SLC-40 / LC-39A
CRS NG-22 (Cygnus (enhanced))[705] LEO (ISS) Northrop Grumman (CRS)
Third of three launches Northrop Grumman acquired from SpaceX while a replacement engine is developed for its Antares rocket.
2024 F9 B5 Unknown Reentry demonstration capsule Possible rideshare LEO The Exploration Company
1600 kg 2.5 metre diameter reduced scale test of a reentry capsule, the full-scale version Nyx (4 metre diameter 8000 kg) is planned to deliver payloads to the ISS and return them back to Earth.[809]
2024? F9 B5 CC,
SLC-40/LC-39A
USSF-31[789] TBA USSF
Classified mission, part of Phase 2 US Space Force contract awarded in 2022.
2024?[810][811] F9 B5 ♺[758][812] CCSFS,
SLC-40[711]
WorldView Legion 3-4 Mission 2 (2 sats)[813] SSO Maxar Technologies
Maxar Technologies built satellites.
2024?[810][811] F9 B5 ♺[758][812] CC,
SLC-40/LC-39A[713]
WorldView Legion 5 & 6 Mission 3 (2 sats)[813] SSO Maxar Technologies
Maxar Technologies built satellites.

2025[edit]

Date and time (UTC) Version,
booster[c]
Launch site Payload[d] Orbit Customer
February 2025 F9 B5 VSFB or CC Transporter-13, SmallSat Rideshare[727] SSO Various
Dedicated SmallSat Rideshare mission to sun-synchronous orbit.
February 2025 F9 B5 VSFB or CC Bandwagon-3, SmallSat Rideshare[727][734] LEO Various
Dedicated SmallSat Rideshare mission to 45 degree inclination 550–600 km altitude.
April 2025[814] F9 B5 VSFB,
SLC-4E
SPHEREx
PUNCH[815]
SSO[816] NASA, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration
In February 2021, NASA, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration announced a $99 million contract for its Astrophysics Division.
April 2025 F9 B5 VSFB or CC TRACERS[817] SSO NASA, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Tandem Reconnection and Cusp Electrodynamics Reconnaissance Satellites (TRACERS) is a Small Explorers program mission. Expected to be part of a rideshare mission.[818]
April 2025 onwards F9 B5 VSFB,
SLC-4E
12 launches for Rivada broadband constellation[819] LEO Rivada Space Networks
In March 2023, Rivada contracted SpaceX to launch 300 B2B broadband satellites over 12 Falcon 9 launches between April 2025 and June 2026.
May 2025 F9 B5 VSFB or CC Bandwagon-4, SmallSat Rideshare[727][734] LEO Various
Dedicated SmallSat Rideshare mission to 45 degree inclination 550–600 km altitude.
June 2025 F9 B5 VSFB or CC Transporter-14, SmallSat Rideshare[727] SSO Various
Dedicated SmallSat Rideshare mission to sun-synchronous orbit.
H2 2025 onwards (3 flights)[820][821] F9 B5 VSFB or CC Project Kuiper constellation deployment LEO Kuiper Systems / Amazon
Announced Dec 1st, 2023. Three Falcon 9 launches beginning in the second half of 2025 in support of Amazon’s Project Kuiper megaconstellation.
August 2025 F9 B5 VSFB or CC Haven-1[822] LEO Vast
Launch of a new commercial space station by Vast Space.
September 2025 F9 B5 KSC,
LC-39A
Vast-1[822] LEO Vast
First crewed mission to the Haven-1 space station.
October 2025 F9 B5 VSFB or CC Transporter-15, SmallSat Rideshare[727] SSO Various
Dedicated SmallSat Rideshare mission to sun-synchronous orbit.
November 2025 F9 B5 VSFB,
SLC-4E
Sentinel-6B[823] LEO NASA, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration/NOAA, The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/EUMETSAT/ESA
Identical to Sentinel-6A.[824]
December 2025[825] F9 B5 KSC,
LC-39A
Interstellar Mapping and Acceleration Probe (IMAP)[826] Sun–Earth L1 NASA, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration
In September 2020, NASA, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration selected SpaceX to launch the IMAP mission, which will help researchers better understand the boundary of the heliosphere, a magnetic barrier surrounding our solar system. The total launch cost is approximately US$109.4 million. The secondary payloads include two NASA, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration heliophysics missions of opportunity and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Space Weather Follow On-Lagrange 1 (SWFO-L1) mission.[826]
Q4 2025[827] F9 B5 CC,
SLC-40 / LC-39A
CHORUS LEO MDA
Announced in October 2023, CHORUS will be a commercial Earth observation constellation owned and operated by MDA Ltd. Will utilize C and X-band SAR.
2025[828] F9 B5 VSFB or CC CAS500-4[829] Likely Rideshare SSO Korea Aerospace Industries
A satellite to monitor Korean agriculture.
2025 F9 B5 CC,
SLC-40 / LC-39A
Globalstar-3 M104–120 (17 satellites)[830] LEO Globalstar
Globalstar’s third-generation satellite constellation, launching to a 52 degree inclination orbit at an altitude of 1,410 km.[831]
2025[801] F9 B5 CC,
SLC-40 / LC-39A
O3b mPOWER 9-11[832] MEO SES
In August 2020, SES expanded the O3b mPOWER contract with a fourth launch.[803][833] In October 2023 the mission was delayed to 2025 due to electrical issues discovered in the first four satellites of the constellation.[801]
2025[834] F9 B5 CC,
SLC-40 / LC-39A
Mission Robotic Vehicle (MRV) × 1[835]
Mission Extension Pod (MEP) × 3
GTO Northrop Grumman
Developed from Northrop Grumman’s 2,000 kg Mission Extension Vehicle architecture. One MEP (400 kg each) will be attached to Optus D3.[836]
2025 F9 B5 CC,
SLC-40/LC-39A
Skynet 6A[837] GTO Airbus / UK Ministry of Defence
British military communications satellite ordered to bridge the gap between Skynet-5 and its successor.[838]
2025 F9 B5 CC,
SLC-40/LC-39A
Spainsat NG II[786] GTO Hisdesat
Communications satellite built on the Eurostar-Neo platform, to be utilized by the Spanish government and its allies.[787] Second of two launches for the Spainsat-NG program.
~2025 F9 B5 VSFB,
SLC-4E
SDA Tranche 1 Transport layer T1TL-F[839][840] Polar LEO SDA
Launch is part of Phase 2 US Air Force contract awarded in 2022.
~2025 F9 B5 VSFB,
SLC-4E
SDA Tranche 1 Transport layer T1TR-A[839][840] Polar LEO SDA
Launch is part of Phase 2 US Air Force contract awarded in 2022.
~2025 F9 B5 VSFB,
SLC-4E
SDA Tranche 1 Transport layer T1TR-E[839][840] Polar LEO SDA
Launch is part of Phase 2 US Air Force contract awarded in 2022.
~2025 F9 B5 VSFB,
SLC-4E
SDA Tranche 1 Transport layer T2TL-A[839][840] Polar LEO SDA
Launch is part of Phase 2 US Air Force contract awarded in 2022.
~2025 F9 B5 VSFB,
SLC-4E
SDA Tranche 1 Transport layer T2TL-C[839][840] Polar LEO SDA
Launch is part of Phase 2 US Air Force contract awarded in 2022.
~2025 F9 B5 CC,
SLC-40/LC-39A
NROL-77[839][840] Classified NRO
Launch is part of Phase 2 US Air Force contract awarded in 2022.
~2025 F9 B5 CC,
SLC-40/LC-39A
GPS III-10[839][840] MEO USSF
Launch is part of Phase 2 US Air Force contract awarded in 2022.
2025[841] Falcon Heavy B5 KSC,
LC-39A
Power and Propulsion Element (PPE)
Habitation and Logistics Outpost (HALO)[842]
TLI NASA, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (Artemis)
First elements for the Gateway station as part of the Artemis program, awarded in February 2021. The launch will cost NASA, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration $331.8 million and will utilize Falcon Heavy’s extended fairing.
2025–2026
(4 flights)
F9 B5 CC,
SLC-40 / LC-39A
SpaceX CRS-32 to SpaceX CRS-35[736] LEO (ISS) NASA, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (CRS)
Six additional CRS-2 missions for Dragon 2 were announced in March 2022, resupplying the ISS until 2026.

2026 and beyond[edit]

Date and time (UTC) Version,
booster[c]
Launch site Payload[d] Orbit Customer
Q1 2026 F9 B5 VSFB or CC Transporter-16, SmallSat Rideshare[727] SSO Various
Dedicated SmallSat Rideshare mission to sun-synchronous orbit.
Q2 2026 F9 B5 VSFB or CC Transporter-17, SmallSat Rideshare[727] SSO Various
Dedicated SmallSat Rideshare mission to sun-synchronous orbit.
Q4 2026 F9 B5 VSFB or CC Transporter-18, SmallSat Rideshare[727] SSO Various
Dedicated SmallSat Rideshare mission to sun-synchronous orbit.
~2026 Falcon Heavy B5 KSC,
LC-39A
USSF-75[839][840] GSO USSF
~2026 Falcon Heavy B5 KSC,
LC-39A
USSF-70[839][840] GSO USSF
2026[843] F9 B5 CC,
SLC-40/LC-39A
Arabsat 7A[561][844] GTO Arabsat
Announced in September 2022, Arabsat 7A will enter a geostationary orbit after its launch by a Falcon 9 rocket.
2026[801] F9 B5 CC,
SLC-40 / LC-39A
O3b mPOWER 12 & 13 MEO SES
Two additional satellites were announced in October 2023 due to electrical issues discovered in the first four satellites of the constellation.[801]
2026[845] Falcon Heavy B5 KSC,
LC-39A
Astrobotic Technology Lunar Lander[846] TLI Astrobotic Technology
Astrobotic’s third upcoming lander mission to the Moon. Targeting a South Pole landing in 2026.
2026 and later
(14 flights)
F9 B5 VSFB and CC Telesat Lightspeed × 18 LEO Telesat
Announced in September 2023, Telesat has booked 14 launches of up to 18 satellites each.[847]
2026–2030 F9 B5 CC,
SLC-40/LC-39A
5 more launches (Crew-10 through Crew-14)[848] LEO (ISS) NASA, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (ISS)
In June 2022, NASA, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration announced it purchased an additional 5 crewed flights from SpaceX in addition to the previous 9 missions on top of the $3.5 billion contract.[849]
Q1 2027 F9 B5 VSFB or CC Transporter-19, SmallSat Rideshare[727] SSO Various
Dedicated SmallSat Rideshare mission to sun-synchronous orbit.
May 2027[850] Falcon Heavy B5 KSC,
LC-39A
Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope[851] Sun–Earth L2 NASA, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Flagship-class infrared space telescope.
Q2 2027 F9 B5 VSFB or CC Transporter-20, SmallSat Rideshare[727] SSO Various
Dedicated SmallSat Rideshare mission to sun-synchronous orbit.
Q4 2027 F9 B5 VSFB or CC Transporter-21, SmallSat Rideshare[727] SSO Various
Dedicated SmallSat Rideshare mission to sun-synchronous orbit.
2027[852][853] Falcon Heavy B5 KSC,
LC-39A
GPS IIIF-1[839][854] MEO USSF
First GPS Block IIIF launch.
2028[845][855] Falcon Heavy B5 KSC,
LC-39A
GLS-1 (Dragon XL) TLI NASA, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (Gateway Logistics Services)
In March 2020, NASA, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration announced its first contract for the Gateway Logistics Services that guarantees at least two launches on a new variant of the Dragon spacecraft that will carry over 5 tonnes of cargo to the Lunar Gateway on 6–12 months long missions.[856][857]
2029[845] Falcon Heavy B5 KSC,
LC-39A
GLS-2 (Dragon XL)[858] TLI NASA, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (Gateway Logistics Services)
Second Dragon XL logistics module.[858]

Notable launches[edit]

First flights and contracts[edit]

Launch of Falcon 9 Flight 1 with a boilerplate Dragon
Dragon CRS-1 berthed to the International Space Station (ISS) on 14 October 2012, photographed from the Cupola.

On 4 June 2010, the first Falcon 9 launch successfully placed a test payload into the intended orbit.[859] The second launch of Falcon 9 was COTS Demo Flight 1, which placed an operational Dragon capsule in orbit on 8 December 2010.[860] The capsule re-entered the atmosphere after two orbits, allowing for testing the reentry procedures. The capsule was recovered off the coast of Mexico[861] and then placed on display at SpaceX headquarters.[862] The remaining objectives of the NASA, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration COTS qualification program were combined into a single Dragon C2+ mission, on the condition that all milestones might be validated in space before berthing Dragon to the ISS.[863] The Dragon capsule was propelled to orbit in May 2012, and following successful tests in the next days it was grabbed with the station’s robotic arm (Canadarm2) and docked to the ISS docking port for the first time on 25 May. After successfully completing all the return procedures, the recovered Dragon C2+ capsule was put on display at Kennedy Space Center.[864] Thus, Falcon 9 and Dragon became the first fully commercially developed launcher to deliver a payload to the International Space Station, paving the way for SpaceX and NASA, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration to sign the first Commercial Resupply Services agreement for cargo deliveries.[865]

The first operational cargo resupply mission to ISS, the fourth flight of Falcon 9, was launched in October 2012. An engine suffered a loss of pressure at 76 seconds after liftoff, which caused an automatic shutdown of that engine, but the remaining eight first-stage engines continued to burn and the Dragon capsule reached orbit successfully and thus demonstrated the rocket’s “engine out” capability in flight.[866] Due to ISS visiting vehicle safety rules, at NASA, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s request, the secondary payload Orbcomm-2 was released into a lower-than-intended orbit.[867] Despite this incident, Orbcomm said they gathered useful test data from the mission and later in 2014, launched more satellites via SpaceX.[868] The mission continued to rendezvous and berth the Dragon capsule with the ISS where the ISS crew unloaded its payload and reloaded the spacecraft with cargo for return to Earth.[869]

Following unsuccessful attempts at recovering the first stage with parachutes, SpaceX upgraded to a much larger first stage booster and with greater thrust, termed Falcon 9 v1.1, and performed a demonstration flight of this version in September 2013.[870] After the second stage separation and delivering CASSIOPE, a very small payload relative to the rocket’s capability, SpaceX conducted a novel high-altitude, high-velocity flight test wherein the booster attempted to reenter the lower atmosphere in a controlled manner and decelerate to a simulated over-water landing.[871]

Loss of CRS-7 mission[edit]

SpaceX CRS-7 disintegrating two minutes after liftoff, as seen from a NASA, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration tracking camera.

In June 2015, Falcon 9 Flight 19 carried a Dragon capsule on the seventh Commercial Resupply Services mission to the ISS. The second stage disintegrated due to an internal helium tank failure while the first stage was still burning normally. This was the first (and only as of Sep 2023) primary mission loss for any Falcon 9 rocket.[872] In addition to ISS consumables and experiments, this mission carried the first International Docking Adapter (IDA-1), whose loss delayed preparedness of the station’s US Orbital Segment (USOS) for future crewed missions.[873]

Performance was nominal until T+140 seconds into launch when a cloud of white vapor appeared, followed by rapid loss of second-stage LOX tank pressure. The booster continued on its trajectory until complete vehicle breakup at T+150 seconds. The Dragon capsule was ejected from the disintegrating rocket and continued transmitting data until impact with the ocean. SpaceX officials stated that the capsule can have been recovered if the parachutes had deployed; however, the Dragon software did not include any provisions for parachute deployment in this situation.[874] Subsequent investigations traced the cause of the accident to the failure of a strut that secured a helium bottle inside the second-stage LOX tank. With the helium pressurization system integrity breached, excess helium quickly flooded the tank, eventually causing it to burst from overpressure.[875][876] NASA, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s independent accident investigation into the loss of SpaceX CRS-7 found that the failure of the strut which led to the breakup of the Falcon-9 represented a design error. Specifically, that industrial grade stainless steel had been used in a critical load path under cryogenic conditions and flight conditions, without additional part screening, and without regard to manufacturer recommendations.[877]

Full-thrust version and first booster landings[edit]

Falcon 9 Flight 20 historic first-stage landing at CCSFS Landing Zone 1, 22 December 2015

After pausing launches for months, SpaceX launched on 22 December 2015, the highly anticipated return-to-flight mission after the loss of CRS-7. This launch inaugurated a new Falcon 9 Full Thrust version of its flagship rocket featuring increased performance, notably thanks to subcooling of the propellants. After launching a constellation of 11 Orbcomm-OG2 second-generation satellites,[878] the first stage performed a controlled-descent and landing test for the eighth time, SpaceX attempted to land the booster on land for the first time. It managed to return the first stage successfully to the Landing Zone 1 at Cape Canaveral, marking the first successful recovery of a rocket first stage that launched a payload to orbit.[879] After recovery, the first stage booster performed further ground tests and then was put on permanent display outside SpaceX’s headquarters in Hawthorne, California.[880]

On 8 April 2016, SpaceX delivered its commercial resupply mission to the International Space Station marking the return-to-flight of the Dragon capsule, after the loss of CRS-7. After separation, the first-stage booster slowed itself with a boostback maneuver, re-entered the atmosphere, executed an automated controlled descent and landed vertically onto the drone ship Of Course I Still Love You, marking the first successful landing of a rocket on a ship at sea.[881] This was the fourth attempt to land on a drone ship, as part of the company’s experimental controlled-descent and landing tests.[882]

Loss of AMOS-6 on the launch pad[edit]

On 1 September 2016, the 29th Falcon 9 rocket exploded on the launchpad while propellant was being loaded for a routine pre-launch static fire test. The payload, Israeli satellite AMOS-6, partly commissioned by Facebook, was destroyed with the launcher.[883] On 2 January 2017, SpaceX released an official statement indicating that the cause of the failure was a buckled liner in several of the COPV tanks, causing perforations that allowed liquid and/or solid oxygen to accumulate underneath the COPVs carbon strands, which were subsequently ignited possibly due to friction of breaking strands.[884]

Zuma launch[edit]

Zuma was a classified United States government satellite and was developed and built by Northrop Grumman at an estimated cost of US$3.5 billion.[885] Its launch, originally planned for mid-November 2017, was postponed to 8 January 2018 as fairing tests for another SpaceX customer were assessed. Following a successful Falcon 9 launch, the first-stage booster landed at LZ-1.[886] Unconfirmed reports suggested that the Zuma spacecraft was lost,[887] with claims that either the payload failed following orbital release, or that the customer-provided adapter failed to release the satellite from the upper stage, while other claims argued that Zuma was in orbit and operating covertly.[887] SpaceX’s COO Gwynne Shotwell stated that their Falcon 9 “did everything correctly” and that “Information published that is contrary to this statement is categorically false”.[887] A preliminary report indicated that the payload adapter, modified by Northrop Grumman after purchasing it from a subcontractor, failed to separate the satellite from the second stage under the zero gravity conditions.[888][885] Due to the classified nature of the mission, no further official information is expected.[887]

Falcon Heavy test flight[edit]

Liftoff of Falcon Heavy on its maiden flight (left) and its two side-boosters landing at LZ-1 and LZ-2 a few minutes later (right)

The maiden launch of the Falcon Heavy occurred on 6 February 2018, temporarily making it the most powerful rocket since the Saturn V, with a theoretical payload capacity to low Earth orbit more than double the Delta IV Heavy.[889][890] Both side boosters landed nearly simultaneously after a ten-minute flight. The central core failed to land on a floating platform at sea.[891] The rocket carried a car and a mannequin to an eccentric heliocentric orbit that reaches further than aphelion of Mars.[892]

First crewed flights[edit]

On 2 March 2019, SpaceX launched its first orbital flight of Dragon 2 (Crew Dragon). It was an uncrewed mission to the International Space Station. The Dragon contained a mannequin named Ripley, which was equipped with multiple sensors to gather data about how a human might feel during the flight. Along with the mannequin was 300 pounds of cargo of food and other supplies.[893] Also on board was Earth plush toy referred to as a “Super high tech zero-g indicator”.[894] The toy became a hit with astronaut Anne McClain, who showed the plushy on the ISS each day[895] and also deciding to keep it on board to experience the crewed SpX-DM2.

The Dragon spent six days in space, including five days docked to the International Space Station. During the time, various systems were tested to make sure the vehicle was ready for US astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken to fly in it in 2020. The Dragon undocked and performed a re-entry burn before splashing down on 8 March 2019, at 08:45 EST, 320 km (200 mi) off the coast of Florida.[896]

SpaceX held a successful launch of the first commercial orbital human space flight on 30 May 2020, crewed with NASA, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken. Both astronauts focused on conducting tests on the Crew Dragon capsule. Crew Dragon successfully returned to Earth, splashing down in the Gulf of Mexico on 2 August 2020.[897]

Reuse of the first stage[edit]

SpaceX has developed a program to reuse the first-stage booster, setting multiple booster reflight records:

  • B1021 became, on 30 March 2017, the first booster to be successfully recovered a second time, on Flight 32 launching the SES-10 satellite. After that, it was retired and put on display at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.[898]
  • B1046, the first Block 5 booster, became the first to launch three times, carrying Spaceflight SSO-A on 3 December 2018.
  • B1048 was the first booster to be recovered four times on 11 November 2019, and the first to perform a fifth flight on 18 March 2020, but the booster was lost during re-entry.
  • B1049 was the first booster to be recovered five times on 4 June 2020, six times on 18 August 2020, and seven times on 25 November 2020.
  • B1051 became the first booster to be recovered eight times on 20 January 2021, nine times on 14 March 2021, and ten times on 9 May 2021, achieving one of SpaceX’s milestone goals for reuse. It then became the first booster to be recovered eleven times on 18 December 2021, and twelve times on 19 March 2022.[899][900][901][902]
  • B1060 became the first booster to be recovered 13 times on 17 June 2022.
  • B1058 became the first booster to be recovered 14 times on 11 September 2022, 15 times on 17 December 2022, 16 times on 10 July 2023, 17 times on 20 September 2023, 18 times on 4 November 2023 and 19 times on 23 December 2023.
  • B1069 launched and returned a hosted box containing two FIFA 2022 World Cup Adidas Al Rihla on 15 October 2022 for a sub-orbital flight, the first payload on a Falcon 9 booster.[903]
  • B1061 became the only booster on 30 December 2022 to launch from all SpaceX’s different launch sites and on all of SpaceX’s different landing zones and drone ships (except rarely used LZ-2 that is located nearby LZ-1).
  • B1062 booster holds the record for fastest turnaround at 21 days. It launched on 8 April and again on 29 April 2022.[323]
  • B1080 became the first booster to land onshore after launching a crewed mission (Ax-2) on 21 May 2023.

See also[edit]

  1. ^ The AMOS-6 spacecraft was destroyed in a static fire test prior to launch; the mission is counted as a failure but not as a launch.
  2. ^ There was also an on-pad explosion; sometimes it is counted as a launch, resulting in 64 launches.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h Falcon 9 first-stage boosters are designated with a construction serial number and an optional flight number when reused, e.g. B1021.1 and B1021.2 represent the two flights of booster B1021. Launches using reused boosters are denoted with a recycled symbol ♺.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h Dragon 1 or 2 are designated with a construction serial number or name and an optional flight number when reused, e.g. Dragon C106.1 and Dragon C106.2 represent the two flights of Dragon C106. Dragon spacecraft that are reused are denoted with a recycled symbol ♺.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g Many Transporter payloads are not public, or don’t have a publicly revealed mass. SpaceX has not published a payload mass estimate for this mission.
  6. ^ After landing, de-tanking and heading back home, the stage and Octagrabber were damaged in heavy seas. This is still considered a successful landing as the stage damage occurred while in transport.[267]
  7. ^ Despite making a successful landing, de-tanking and heading back home, the stage fell over on the drone ship platform during transit back to Cape Canaveral in rough seas, high winds and waves. This is still considered a successful landing as the stage damage occurred while in transport.[669]

References[edit]

  1. ^ “Falcon 9 Overview”. SpaceX. 8 May 2010. Archived from the original on 5 August 2014.
  2. ^ Simberg, Rand (8 February 2012). “Elon Musk on SpaceX’s Reusable Rocket Plans”. Popular Mechanics. Archived from the original on 24 June 2017. Retrieved 2 November 2017.
  3. ^ Wall, Mike (21 December 2015). “Wow! SpaceX Lands Orbital Rocket Successfully in Historic First”. Space.com. Archived from the original on 15 August 2017. Retrieved 17 August 2017.
  4. ^ Smith, Rich (5 October 2020). “How Much Cheaper Are SpaceX Reusable Rockets? Now We Know”. The Motley Fool. Archived from the original on 15 May 2022. Retrieved 21 May 2022.
  5. ^ Brown, Mike (22 August 2020). “SpaceX: Elon Musk breaks down the cost of reusable rockets”. Inverse. Archived from the original on 23 August 2020. Retrieved 21 May 2022.
  6. ^ “In 2023, SpaceX completed 96 successful missions, safely flew 12 more astronauts to orbit, launched two flight tests of Starship, and more than doubled the number of people around the world connected by @Starlink. Watch @elonmusk deliver a company update:”. X (formerly Twitter).
  7. ^ a b c d “Starlink Mission”. YouTube. Retrieved 26 January 2023.
  8. ^ a b Musk, Elon [@elonmusk] (20 October 2022). “Congrats to @SpaceX team on 48th launch this year! Falcon 9 now holds record for most launches of a single vehicle type in a year” (Tweet). Archived from the original on 13 December 2022. Retrieved 21 December 2022 – via Twitter.
  9. ^ Will Robinson-Smith (13 January 2024). “SpaceX launches Falcon 9 launch following Saturday night scrub”. Spaceflight Now.
  10. ^ “SpaceX debuts new model of the Falcon 9 rocket designed for astronauts”. Spaceflightnow.com. 11 May 2018. Archived from the original on 1 April 2021. Retrieved 25 May 2022.
  11. ^ Baylor, Michael (17 May 2018). “With Block 5, SpaceX to increase launch cadence and lower prices”. NASA, The National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationSpaceFlight.com. Archived from the original on 18 May 2018. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  12. ^ “In 2023, SpaceX completed 96 successful missions, safely flew 12 more astronauts to orbit, launched two flight tests of Starship, and more than doubled the number of people around the world connected by @Starlink. Watch @elonmusk deliver a company update:”. X (formerly Twitter).
  13. ^ Jeff Foust (29 September 2017). “Musk unveils revised version of giant interplanetary launch system Archived 8 October 2017 at Archive-It”. SpaceNews. Archived from the original on 8 October 2017. Retrieved 3 May 2018.
  14. ^ “Orbital Launches of 2020”. space.skyrocket.de. Archived from the original on 26 January 2021. Retrieved 13 December 2023.
  15. ^ “SpaceX launches more Starlink satellites, tests design change for astronomers”. spaceflightnow. 7 January 2020. Archived from the original on 7 January 2020. Retrieved 13 December 2023.
  16. ^ a b c d e f g h i “SpaceX and Cape Canaveral Return to Action with First Operational Starlink Mission”. NASA, The National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationSpaceFlight.com. 11 November 2019. Archived from the original on 11 November 2020. Retrieved 11 November 2019.
  17. ^ “SpaceX working on fix for Starlink satellites so they don’t disrupt astronomy”. 7 December 2019. Archived from the original on 2 January 2020. Retrieved 10 December 2019.
  18. ^ Clark, Stephen. “Live coverage: SpaceX successfully performs Crew Dragon abort test”. Spaceflight Now. Archived from the original on 17 January 2020. Retrieved 19 January 2020.
  19. ^ Foust, Jeff (2 July 2015). “NASA, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration and SpaceX Delay Dragon In-Flight Abort Test”. SpaceNews. Retrieved 3 May 2016.
  20. ^ Pietrobon, Steven (18 January 2020). “UNITED STATES SUBORBITAL LAUNCH MANIFEST (18 January 2020)”. Steven Pietrobon’s Space Archive. Archived from the original on 5 March 2021. Retrieved 18 January 2020.
  21. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q “Boeing, SpaceX Secure Additional Crewed Missions Under NASA, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s Commercial Space Transport Program”. 4 January 2017. Archived from the original on 22 December 2018. Retrieved 7 March 2017.
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